Category Archives: Admin

Is Enoch’s Eyebrow a Shill?


The other day in Bodrum, I heard for the first time about “shills.” These are people whose profession is to disrupt blogs and Internet discussions in general. One of their techniques is to keep expressing unfashionable opinions on race, to the point where an entire blog becomes tainted, and its writers begin to drop away.

I wonder if “Enoch’s Eyebrow” is one of these? Until I threatened to reveal his IP address, he posted under at least three names. He may still be posting under more than one. He has also taken to Judaising the least relevant topics. See, for example, his comments on my piece about spitting in the street. What this has to do with free speech and the Jews is quite beyond my imagination.

It could be that I’m paranoid – or it could be that our patience is being abused. I don’t know, and I look forward to any comment our regulars may care to make.

Of course, if Mr Eyebrow is honest but overly enthusiastic in his opinions, his best response to my wondering will be to confine himself to discussions where his comments may have some relevance.

More on Volunteering


Here is an e-mail I sent earlier. It explains itself. Anyone else who’d like to join the good work knows where I am.

Dear Xxxx,

Thanks for offering to help with getting the LA archive ready for
publication as html documents. Our ambition is to have everything
available on our website as both pdf (pretty in hard copy) and html
(more useful for web viewing).

Here is the complete Religious Notes archive – our smallest, that
is. I’ve converted the pdf files to MSWord. That was an automated
process. The time-consuming bit is to reformat the documents so they
can be poured into the LA website as html documents. That means
doing the following:

1. Turn double column to single column

2. Remove all text from boxes and paste at the top of the document

3. Revise pasted text to standard form

4. Clean up main text – ie, remove unnecessary hyphens and take out
all mention of LA officers (most are dead or retired)

I supply a sample file that I’ve cleaned up, to show the sort of
thing that we need. I could give detailed instruction about how to
make the necessary changes. But I think it a good idea to leave you
to sort out your own method.

There is nothing hard about all this. My problem is that it’s fiddly
and I am at a time in life when I can’t just sit at the computer
doing the same clean up 800 times.

No great hurry – it’s been years in the waiting, and a while longer
can’t do any harm.

Best wishes,

Sean

Talkin’-’bout my Generation


David Davis

In the late afternoons of our lives, various thoughts occur. I had a cyberchat with my colleague, the Dear Leader of the Libertarian Alliance, Dr Sean Gabb, at some indeterminate time overnight last night. We both agreed on some things:- Continue reading

Director’s Bulletin, 9th November 2009


 

Director’s Bulletin
9th November 2009

I would have written this Bulletin several weeks ago. However, I can supply many excuses for not having lifted a finger. The most convincing – and perhaps the truest – is that I have been installing Windows 7 Professional 64 bit. Mr Gates wrote to me at the beginning of October, offering me a copy of his latest operating software at the hard to refuse price of £30. So I paid him and downloaded the software. Installing it went like a dream. I didn’t have to download a single driver. It then took several weeks to get the whole system working as I wanted. But I have now been able to fit 8Gb of RAM and give myself what may be more computing power than NASA had in 1969. Many of my friends are hostile to the idea of intellectual property rights. So, for that matter, am I. No doubt, though, Mr Gates does make exceedingly good software. On this occasion, he well deserved his £30. So here goes with the Bulletin.

The LA Conference

Our London conference went off very well. As usual, we were solidly booked, and we had to turn away a few last minute arrivals. The speeches were uniformly good. Guido Fawkes gave an interesting and entertaining speech at the dinner. This year, moreover, we seem to have got the video recording right. I bought a Canon HG10 high definition video camera late last year. This gave me something like television quality video footage. As with all cheapish video cameras, however, the sound quality was rather drossy. So, a few weeks back, I bought a Rode external microphone. This perked the sound up no end. I didn’t get round to hiring the builders’ lights that I kept promising myself. Even so, I think the quality of the video footage is remarkably good. Many thanks to Mario Huet for manning the camera.

You can see the video footage for yourselves by going here: http://vimeo.com/channels/65328

Other Video Files

Now that I can process high definition video at better than real time speeds, I’ve decided to start taking full advantage of the Vimeo account I bought earlier this year, and to upload much better versions of stuff I first made available via Google Video. So please keep an eye on my Vimeo account – http://www.vimeo.com/seangabb. I plan to upload 5Gb a week of video. This will include the celebrated Botsford Archive.

The Chris R. Tame Memorial Prize

You may recall that this year’s title was “Can a Libertarian also be a Conservative?” I had a number of interesting submissions. After much thought, I decided to award the prize to Antoine Clarke. I thought his submission was the best. What most impressed me was that he went beyond the reading matter that I suggested, and he used a quotation from Lord Acton in a most relevant way. We shall publish his essay just as soon as our Editorial Director has found the time to set to work.

Personal Message

At the Conference, I met two people who turned out to be neighbours of mine here in Deal. One of them must walk past my front door every time he goes to the chip shop. Well, with the Baby Bear now jabbering away and insisting on endless viewings of Eddie Cantor in Keep Young and Beautiful and Melina Mercouri in τα παιδιά του Πειραιά (both courtesy of YouTube), Mrs Gabb and I aren’t up to much entertaining. But we can certainly offer coffee. So do please get in touch.

Libertarian Outreach

In the past month, I have written articles for Gay Times and for VDare. The first was about drug legalisation. Sadly, Gay Times doesn’t put it stuff on-line. So, if you want to read my case, you’ll have to put on dark glasses and brave the giggles of Miss Patel in her school uniform as you shamble round your local newsagent – unless, of course, you already subscribe. The second you can read here: http://www.vdare.com/gabb/index.htm

I’m rather pleased with this and with my other articles for VDare. What I’m trying to do is to make a case against the British National Party that doesn’t rely on smears. I don’t believe the BNP is nowadays a national socialist party. Much of what it says – and almost certainly believes – is attractive to millions of people in this country. I admire Nick Griffin for his courage for standing his ground in our post-modern police state. I doubt if I’d be half so brave were Libertarianism to become as unpopular with the authorities as white nationalism is. This being said, he and the entire leadership of the BNP are tainted by what they used to believe. It would be a shame if they were to become the only alternative to the political cartel that now governs England. And I am able to say this to an audience that has not so far been exposed to honest criticism of the BNP.

Other than this, I’ve done quite a lot of radio. And I do promise, now my computer is so wonderfully powerful, to start recording and uploading all this again.

Libertarian Alliance Meetings

Our friends over at the other Libertarian Alliance continue with their monthly meetings. I can hardly ever get up to London to attend these. But they always look very interesting, and I receive endless reports of how interesting they have been.

The next meetings are:

On Monday, 9 November David McDonagh will talk on “Why Classical Liberalism faded after 1860.”
On Monday 14 December, Kristian Niemietz will talk on “20 Years After: The Fall and Rise of Socialism in East Germany”
On Monday 11 January 2010 Antoine Clarke will talk on “The Wisdom of Crowds”.

Contact David McDonagh for details: mcdonagh_d@yahoo.co.uk

Libertarian Holidays

With my two women, I went on holiday in September to Crete. This was my own fifth time there, and Mrs Gabb’s second. This was the first time we had a child with us, and that would always have made it a more difficult time. However, the Baby Bear behaved herself remarkably well. Our problem was the Greeks. They joined the Euro on the basis of massive false accounting, and an optimistic rate of exchange, and then allowed an inflation of costs to continue that has now made their price level into a joke. A result of this was that Crete was almost empty of tourists. Most of the coastal resorts were almost empty. The historical and archaeological sites were abandoned. Unfortunately, rather than cut prices in an attempt to attract the remaining business, the response of the taverna proprietors has been to rip off every foreigner who steps through the door. We spent a fortnight paying about three times more for indifferent kebabs than the Turks round the corner charge here in Deal.

Also, I find myself increasingly dismissive of the modern Greeks. When I was first out there in 1987, I found that they could mostly understand me if I spoke slowly in their strange pronunciation. Nowadays, they seem so pleased with the ugly patois they call Greek that they cannot even follow quotations from the New Testament. Indeed, on our second Sunday, I insisted on attending a church service. The church was empty except for some German tourists. The priest responded to my carefully phrased greeting with the sort of stare you get from a caged animal. He and his deacon raced through the service as if they were trying for a record, then ran out of the church. Mrs Gabb and I stayed awhile to look at some decidedly sub-Byzantine icons and much evidence of mind-rotting superstition. Then we went shopping.

No, my dear readers, if you want a holiday in the Mediterranean, my advice is to avoid Greece. The people nowadays are too degenerate and the prices too high. A better place by far is Bodrum in Turkey. The Turks in general are a fine people – proud and clean and brave. Bodrum in particular is a superb holiday resort. Within a five hour radius of the places, you have Ephesus, Miletus, Hierapolis, Laodicea and Aphrodisias, and many other places of note. There are golf courses, shops, watersports, bars, restaurants, and at least two branches of the Migros supermarket. The moderately Islamic government there has decided to squeeze the taxpayers with high duties on drink. But cigarettes are still a pound a packet, and the Turkish police usually leave foreign tourists alone who break the Euro-style public smoking ban.

And the jewel of Bodrum, in my view, is the Hotel Karia Princess. Owned and run by libertarians, this is a five star establishment, boasting a swimming pool, gymnasium, Turkish bath and some of the best cuisine in the Eastern Mediterranean: http://www.kariaprincess.com

The summer season in Bodrum can be rather oppressive, wherever you choose to stay. But, outside the summer season, I can think of no better place to stay than the Hotel Karia Princess. Try it out. If you haven’t been there already – and I have stayed there four times now – you will be astonished and delighted. My friend Mr Blake even tells me that, once his Blood of Alexandria has made him filthy rich, he will become a permanent guest there.

Any Other Business?

I think the Libertarian Alliance is holding a Christmas reception in December. Stand by for announcements on this. I shall be speaking to some undergraduates at Warwick University on the 19th November. My subject will be something like “Libertarianism: Left or Right?” I plan, between now and Christmas, to convert twenty audio tapes of interviews that Chris Tame conducted with Ralph Harris and Arthur Seldon and upload these to the Web. I will give much moral support to Mr Blake while he works on The Sword of Damascus, which is a long novel about weapons of mass destruction during the early wars between Byzantium and the Caliphate. Like everything else he writes, this will all be in the best possible taste.

Oh – and is there anyone out there who has a socket 775 quad core processor he no longer wants? Donate this to me, and Mr Blake will send you an autographed copy of his Terror of Constantinople. You may recall that this received a most flattering review in The Daily Telegraph:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Terror-Constantinople-Richard-Blake/dp/0340951141

Best wishes to all,

Sean

Sean Gabb
Director, The Libertarian Alliance
sean@libertarian.co.uk
Tel:  07956 472 199  07956 472 199
http://www.libertarian.co.uk
http://www.seangabb.co.uk
http://www.hampdenpress.co.uk
http://libertarianalliance.wordpress.com
FREE download of my book – Cultural Revolution, Culture War: How Conservatives Lost England, and How to Get It Back
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Director’s Bulletin, 9th November 2009

MPs and social death: how many more?


David Davis

One has to wonder who’d want to be an MP these days, after all the moolah-hoo-hah. Certainly Geoff Hoon, whose name has spawned a new pejorative (I always said – from 200 onwards – how could one give a job to someone called Hoon? It, the act of hiring someone called that, defied logic and rationality) and Alastair “Eyebrows” Darling, would want to hang their heads for the rest of their lives at Toynbee Hall.

Perhaps there were fault-lines in the “system”? Or perhaps there were not, and someone clever went along and told all these guys what they could do, and get away with? But either way, the MPs set it up themselves.

I don’t think MPs ought to be paid. Anything. Nothing at all. Then we’ll only get the right type. Prince Philip would do, so long as he agreed to spank Charles every day thereafter, for gassing on mindlessly and hysterically about the rainforest.

Oh, and as I am an upside-down-Gramscian, lefty pop singers and their wives, and anybody at all who supports AGW, need not be selected either. Given the choice, Constituency Associations, who would have to be either shopkeepers, or any other sort of Masterless Men, would probably give them a wide berth naturally.

Will the first libertarian State (minimalist) have to be armed to the teeth against foreing Statists? Discuss.


David Davis

I do worry about this, really I do: and I lie awake at night and I do not know what to suggest.

It does occur to one that in the event of a truly Libertarian “government” – if that’s not oxymoronic – arriving in power somewhere any time soon – and I don’t somehow think it will be here in the UK – what will we do about the following?  

By this I mean the inevitable ire, fulminations, threats, missiles such as the Shithead-3, the Gramsci-VII, the Fabian-V, the Skcidpan-flying-dustbin-Mark37,478-people’s-sword (based as always on the V-2 and about as effective as seen in 1991) sanctions (you name it, we didn’t invent it!) outright attempts at piracy of out trading-ships on the High Seas by the “people’s spontaneously-arising-revolutionary forces of the” states-most-threatened, and the like?

And what is all this sword-iconography about, that “people’s states” seem to affect strongly? Like this stuff?

I do not mean to be churlish about people who sell us things, but why do that when others do or did this?

 

Must like swords, then

Must like swords, then

I confess that I don’t see the point. I don’t think even the statist forces of the UK do swords much on their badges. Swords are old hat (bad pun.)

Perhaps they still use them as machinery to behead people. Well then, personally, I believe that to be repellent and disgusting and (even) very very pre-barbarian, and I would put a stop to it in Westminster now  __in__  all those “nations” (Ha!) who do it today, and I’d go after the f****rs on the High seas if needed. As you all know, this writer does not favour the death penalty under the present cicumstances here, for this reason:-

For we cannot delegate to the Agency at Westminster any rights that we do not ourselves posess.

But to get back to the point of this post, as I have to go out and do orange-diode-stuff to the meters on the Steel Beast for a bit, a Libertarian Admministration would have hard choices: I don’t think all of them will involve domestic policy decisions – which will be easy as we can just fire everybody on the State-payroll, raze the buildings, and mallet the hard-drives of the State departments that will need to be “let go”.

I think some decisions will involve what foreign powers think of us, and I don’t think they will be initially friendly.

Really, I was just looking at this stuff, and thinking strategically. Obviously battleships are a no-no, as they are noe deadmeat, but you get the point.#

Going down Gordon – does Guido know something?


David Davis

http://www.order-order.com/2009/05/johnson-and-miliband-ready-campaign-teams/

I don’t know – do you? Please tell….

But the longer Gordon Brown stays as PM, the longer Labour (and GramscoFabiaNazis in general) will be out of power, and less able to do hurt to people.

I believe that Labour will do several things on 4th June:-

(1) Rig postal voting in rotten boroughs full of poor and easily-bamboozled people who will act as fall-guys,

(2) Stuff ballot-boxes,

(3) Procure the mis-counting of ballot-papers on the night,

(4) Lose much less badly than is predicted,

(5) Get the BBC to present it as “the public sending a message of support for this government’s overall strategic policy”.

A request for Gordon.


 Fred Bloggs

In the face of the current economic crisis, the collapse of the housing market, the raiding of pensions, the nationalisation of banks, and “Jolobial Warmin’”, Gordon Brown should do what any respectable and honourable man would do in this situation.

Commit suicide.

Since this might be a bit hard for Gordon to decide himself, I have put it to a vote on how he will commit suicide.

Time to “come out”.


David Davis

As Überbloggauleiter in charge of the daily-shitegeist of the Libertarian Alliance, I have this morning taken a decision.

This is in part based on my long association with the LA, and what it ought to be for in the end: and also on my long, warm and personal friendship with old Chris Tame and the other early-buggers, most of whom are still about, thank God. If the rest of the Committee and the Advisory Council of the Alliance disagree with what I shall here propose, then they are free to say so on here: we can have a civilised and informed discussion (as you do on here) in full view of our readers, be they friendly or otherwise, about the merits of the following statement:-

The Libertarian Alliance’s opinion on the current situation in British Party Politics is that none of the “main” political parties is up to the task, intellectually or in terms of willpower, to execute the steps needed to liberalise the UK (and/or any of its component parts) and return the State in The United Kingdom forwards, and back thus to its proper size and roles. This list includes the following:

(1) The Labour Party

(2) The Conservative and Unionist Party

(3) the Liberal Democratic Party

(4) The British national Party

(5) The United Kingdom Independence Party

(6) The Green Party

(7) Any other parties not heretofore mentioned (eg Sinn Fein, DUP, SDLP, SNP, Free Wales or whatever it’s called these days, toads-and-newts, the “friends of beer” and the like) except for…


The Libertarian Party of the United Kingdom

In future, it should be understood that the Libertarian Alliance wishes to see, will henceforth actively work online for, a government administration formed by the LPUK. The LA thus rejects any further attempts to try and influence the policy positions of the “other maim parties” (I accidentally typed “maim” but it’s apposite) as they have all shown themselves, with a few honourable exceptions ammong individuals***, antipathetic to positive chance in favour of more individual liberty. nothing is going to change the positions of the main parties this side of a revolution, and these are destructive and undesirable.

I also suggest that the Libertarian Alliance formally state that its members may stand as individuals for election on LPUK tickets.

***Frank Field, David Davis, Daniel Hannan, Enoch Powell (brown-bread sadly) (apologies for not mentioning others, have to go answer phone…)

A very important post by The Devil, on reading, made me think this is now the right thing to do. I quote from his excerpt from Ian Parker-Joseph’s piece:-

On the 1st of January 2009, the Libertarian Party celebrated its first Birthday. From its inception at the beginning of 2008 support for the Libertarian ideals laid out in our manifesto has been steadily growing, and today we have taken the first major steps from that single national structure into regional Branch formations.

We have formally launched the South East Branch this morning, to add to the one we have in the North West, and new Branches throughout the country will soon follow, as will the names and details of our first PPC’s and Local Election Candidates, which will continually be updated as new candidates are taken through our selection process.

As this country slips further into Authoritarian rule the support for Libertarian ideals has never been stronger, or more vocal.

However, as people who are coming to LPUK are telling us in no uncertain terms, the Conservative Party has no room for Libertarian thought, Cameron has made clear that he will be continuing on the present path to a Federal Europe and will not be walking with Libertarians , Osborne is providing more Keynesian economics, and William Hague has refused to commit to a referendum if the Lisbon Treaty is ratified. In other words, more of the same under a disguised ‘nudge’.

Those who have come to us from the LibDems tell of horrific infighting, with the SDP controlled leadership squeezing the Liberal element out of the party, marginalising them at branch level and suggesting that there is no room in the modern LibDem party for them. The LibDems have lost their Liberal roots and become the Social Democratic party, set to continue where Brown leaves off. More of the same.

Both LibDems and Conservatives are on a collision course with the British people, 57% of whom have now indicated that they no longer wish to remain in the EU. They are looking for a genuinely free society, services that work, lower taxes, much smaller government, less nannying and laws that are Made in Britain.

 

 

The voters of Britain are not stupid people, they are not happy about being led on the road to Authoritarian rule, and they are more than aware that the Libertarian Party is the only party that offers a direct rebut to the path we are currently on.

Amid all this wrangling over weaponised dustbins, we are in danger of losing sight of some of the finer things that ought to be preserved after the dawn of liberty


David Davis

I am not sure if the present Queen will survive to the age when she might be graciously allowed to preside over a Libertarian Great Britain, or even a Scotland-Wales-and-Ulster (England having left the UK and possibly requiring something else.) She is already old, and our triumph must still be a long way off as things go now. We must probably pin our hopes on Kate Middleton.

But the survival of quaint, harmless and deeply-morally-based rituals, in the few odd cracks and crannies of what remains of English Civilisation after the various successive ZanuLieBorgs that followed Lord Salisbury, is a good sign.

It is doubtful if there are more than 5 million people alive in the Uk today who know what Maundy Money means; how it originated, or what it represents theologically. Certainly it is not taught any more in Scumbag Schools, either as part of “R E” or anything else – let alone history. No other national traditions have anything similar so far as I know.

Kevin Myers, the great Irish journalist and Man of Letters, once wrote that a key positive of liberal democratic civilisations is that great uplifting liberty and freedom to forget. To be allowed, ultimately, to forget what things mean, that are done by big states – even in the end he said, for example, to forget in the centuries to come why we uncomprehendingly will hand each other poppies in the street on 11th November every year.

The poor wretched subjects of Kim Jong-Il (a troid which this blog loves to hate, for he is bad) are not allowed to forget who is their terrorizer and slave-driver: not allowed to forget what missiles and tanks they now possess, and are weekly paraded before their massed phalnaxes of hungry despairing cheerleaders. The poor Cubans are not allowed to forget the dead GramscoMarxiaNazi pig Castro, even though he died some four years ago) as actroids are wheeled sequentially out to become him, haranguing their cheering thriongs hour after hour, after hour, afte hour. And then on the Wireless, later.

But forgetting is what Free Peoples are allowed to do. It is an astonishing relief; what remains is the necessary social binding between free individuals who must and need to interact in autonomous ways, through the Market and through the normal guidelines of ordinary sociableness that define us as the thinking animal which first did language, for co-operation and survivability.

Nobody I bet you who you ask in the street today will give a f*** about Maundy Money: 91.267% of respondents will think you deranged for even asking. Many indeed of them are trying desperately to pay Gordon Brown’s bills: no washing of the feet of the poor for him! Ugh. Socialists historically who have met poor people, decide they don’t like them very much, and  bugger off. In their black cars.

If we should ever succeed in forging a libertarian civilisation, here or anywhere, I would like to think that things like Maundy Money will survive. This in particular links the “Sovereign” with the rest of ordinary mortals, and shows that – whatever might have gone before – they are people too, and recognise a universal moral authority above themselves.

If the G20 Moochers and Slairs would only stick to this sort of public schmoozing, and leave the rest of us poor sods alone to get on with it, the wordl would rapidly become….


….a better place.

David Davis

Look at this. Really, it’s all very nice and cosy and innately harmless. One is still – despite all that has occurred since, er,well, the beginning of times when one man thought he could enslave and corrupt the will of another – inclined to believe that even these G20-buggers, like the huggers below, are human beings after all.

 

aaaahhhhhh.....blessss....!

aaaahhhhhh.....blessss....!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minimal-statist type libertarians are not in principle against nations deciding to have some sort of titular “Head of State”, if that is what they want, provided that everyone agrees what the limits of authority of such an outfit under Common Law are beforehand, and _provided that_ everyone stays awake sufficiently for those limits to _be observed_ , and _be observed permanently_ . It is dangerous to allow a “State” to deirect, or even have the slightest hand in influencing, things such as “education” or “broadcasting”, if these conditions are to be met. Look at what has happened to ordinary and necessary qualifications for teenagers, for example under modern socialism in the UK, or to the propagandising output of the British State television braodcaster.

The present lot of outfits have clearly got out of hand, are rampaging drunk with power, and ought to be brought to heel. The malign influence of pre-capitalist barbaric anti-guides to survival, such as socialism, cannot be forgotten here.

In a Classical Liberal market civilisation, i suppose it would be perfectly all right for people to dress up as “Heads of State”, jet off to somewhere or other expensive, and pretend to have a “summit”. They could exchange ritual gifts of no value to anyone but each other, such as personalised I-Pods or silver framed photos of their dogs.

Moreover, being all bloggers by necessity, they could even issue “Joint Communiqués”. These would most probably give details of the joints they smoked while together as they will all undoubtedly be superannuated GreeNazis, ageing hippies, GramscoFabiaNazis, sad socialist,s and other varieties of worthless CO2-exhaling scumbag (although rich. Libertarians have “nothing against people getting filthy rich”….aka Tony Blair etc.) Or they might refer to statements of intent to regulate things such as “banks”….The great joy of such an arrangement is that nothing bad would come about as a result of their junketings.

Gerald Warner knows what to do about politicians and their…..


expenses.

Here’s a nice pdf of their 07-08 expenses. Hat tip The Last Ditch and Guido.

David Davis

And while we are about it, we could take telecooks down a peg or two as well:-

Daniel Hannan rips trousers off Gordon Brown. Tears new arshole in public. Shit happens.


Here’s what Labourlist thinks of Daniel Hannan. The comment thread is entirely anti-Labour…..

UPDATE1:-And some very bad news from the Gilts Markets. If the Government can’t sell on its debts, we are all f****d.

UPDATE2:- And this just in from Alex Singleton, about how Gordon Brown’s Attack-Apparatchik-GramscoNazis, such as Harriet Harman, whipped up the mob to attack Sir Fred Goodwin’s house, is even worse. That a person’s private property can be asaulted and trashed, by mobNazis, under the auspices and authorisation of other GoverNazis because they found the soundbytes convenient, is unacceptable, in a civilisation. Therefore, the Nazis will have to go, all of them, including Polly Toynbee, for ever, and ever, and ever, for we can’t afford to have any of these droids encumbering humanity and our destiny in the Universe.***

It will be too expensive to keep Nazis on this earth in the meantime, and the Universe is a dangerous and morally-neutral place. Full of flying rocks, ice, supernovae and other fell objects, none of which have our interests at heart neutrally or otherwise, and we have about 50 million years, only, to find out how to comprehend The Face Of God, and see It,  and Understand His Mind. And get off, to somewhere else (global warming, but not yet as we think we know it.)

(That is part of The Test. To see if we can do it in time. University challenge was only the beginning. Eat your heart out Man U.)

Other matters:-

If Daniel Hannan disappears, I will put him up here.

And I see The Devil got it down too. But I think we beat him by some minutes….p’raps we get pu earlier in the North.

Sorry, I did mean, really, to type “up”. Perhaps we poo earlier too: I do not know.

Here’s James Burdett on Daniel.

*** Perhaps that’s how Evil works: life arises, gets going for a bit, gets “highly organised and highly-evolved”, then – socialism steps in, and it all coems to a sad, planetary-death-type end, before anyone can get off to The Stars.

F A Hayek: the 1978 UCLA interviews….


David Davis

….with main portal to them on the Ludwig von Mises Institute blog.

Here is the archive in pdf.

For newer readers who may not have swum in libertarian, or in Austrian-School-economic waters for very long, you can find out about Friedrich Hayek here, and why he was a key classical liberal/libertarian philosopher.

Here also is stuff which some of you might like about Ludwig von Mises.

The Kevin Dowd lecture on free banking | Samizdata.net


Sean Gabb

The Kevin Dowd lecture on free banking | Samizdata.net

The Kevin Dowd lecture on free banking

Johnathan Pearce (London) Globalization/economics

As promised, I have some thoughts following on from the talk given by Kevin Dowd, a professor at the Nottingham University Business School and a noted advocate of what is called “free banking”. He gave his talk at the annual Chris R. Tame Memorial Lecture as hosted by the Libertarian Alliance. (The LA was founded by Mr Tame, who died three years ago at a distressingly young age after losing a battle against cancer.)

Professor Dowd covered some territory that is already pretty well-trodden ground for Samizdata’s regular readers, so I will skim over the part of the lecture that focused on the damage done by unwisely loose monetary policy of state organisations such as central banks, or the moral-hazard engines of tax bailouts for banks.

Instead, I want to focus on those aspects of Professor Dowd’s talk in which he tried to sketch out what a laissez faire, free market banking system would actually look like. This is essential; a great deal of commentary so far – while it is very good – has mainly focused on how we got into this fix and why the fixes being attempted by Western governments are proving so stupid. As PJ Rourke said recently, the attempt by the Obama administration to flood the market with cheap money as a “solution” is a bit like the case of when your Dad has burned the dinner, so you ask the dog to cook it instead. No, what Professor Dowd did this week was lay out three broad areas for reform.

Firstly, he says we should remove many of the existing regulations, government-mandated deposit protection schemes, bank capital adequacy rules and other restrictions on what banks can do and how they work. For example, government support for depositors – who are also effectively creditors to their banks – means that there is a moral hazard problem; the banks have less incentive than they would otherwise have to act prudently if there is always the government, acting like a sort of 7th Cavalry, able to ride to the rescue. That has to go. Professor Dowd also wants to hack away at the morass of rules and regulations that violate client/banker confidentiality, or those rules that force banks to lend to people, as is the case in the US, where banks are forced to lend to certain groups or else violate laws about racial discrimination, etc.

Secondly, Professor Dowd addresses the issue of letting banks fail. At the present, policymakers adopt a sort of “too big to fail” doctrine; this doctrine, while not explicitly laid down in any form of statute or operating manual – as far as I know – is a rule that says that some institutions are so large, and the attendant systemic risks posed by their failure so catastrophic, that they should not be allowed to go out of business. The problem of course is that this rule of thumb is often arbitrary and subject to political horse-trading. To wit: the US government’s decision to let Lehman Brothers go down last September, followed shortly by the $85 billion bailout for AIG, showed a total lack of clear message to the markets, and to bankers, one way or the other.

Professor Dowd believes that banks should be allowed to fail and furthermore, if modern limited liability laws were weakened or abolished completely, then such massive conglomerates would be economically and legally unsustainable in the first place.

As a result, banks would probably be smaller, and there would be a lot more of them, so the failure of any individual bank, while unpleasant for some, would not wreck the system as could happen if a mega-bank goes wrong. Also, instead of wide-ranging and hideously expensive bailouts, Professor Dowd favours putting banks into administration, writing down, in full, the value of their loan books, and getting depositors to exchange their status as creditors for that of an equity holder.

This “debt for equity swap” arrangement, while it would anger depositors who lose money, would come with the promise, and hopefully the reality, of a rise in the capital value of their equity stake in a bank if confidence returns to a more robust banking sector, as the debt/equity swap recapitalisation is designed to achieve. And of course banks are entirely free, as are their clients, to take out deposit insurance in a commercial market.

The third leg of his solution is broader, and more long-term, although there are some immediate measures that could be taken. Professor Dowd is against fiat money – money not backed by actual commodities or real assets of any kind – and in moving to a commodity-based/asset-based system. He is not, by the way, necessarily arguing for the gold standard or some gold-based system, although he points out that in the 200 years up to the First World War, the UK enjoyed a remarkable period of stable prices, with the odd blip. What he is arguing, however, is that the message on a banknote that says “I promise to pay the bearer on demand the sum of X” should be an enforceable legal contract, not what amounts to the jeering joke that it now is.

In the subsequent Q&A session afterwards, one person made the excellent point that a simple reform would be to ban legal tender laws. Such laws currently require a person to accept as legal tender a currency that the state has mandated for a particular region. Instead, if a person wants to refuse to accept sterling and only wants to accept dollars, euros or Swiss francs instead, he can do so. He can also choose to trade in whatever medium of exchange he wants, and with whoever wants to accept it.

Inevitable questions arise. First of all, in thinking about free banking, private monetary systems and the like, the first objection will be is that this will be very messy; there has been no real experience of such monetary systems in the past, etc.

But this is incorrect. Free banking, as defined by Professor Dowd, in fact operated in Scotland, for example, up until legal changes in 1845. South of the River Tweed, the English system had operated under what amounted to state-controlled banking under the Bank of England, set up in 1692. In the 18th and 19th centuries, England saw a number of booms and recessions, such as the 1840s railway boom and the downturn of 1870s. One should remember that the BoE was established by the-then post-Glorious Revolution government as a way to raise money for wars without having to keep asking a fractious public for taxes, and without having to borrow at expensive rates in the money markets. N.A.M. Roger has explained this issue of financing for naval warfare brilliantly. Indeed, it reminds us that state monopoly money systems typically arose in order to finance wars, while the welfarist aspects came later.

There are also current, not just old, examples of banks that operate with unlimited liability partnership structures – Pictet, the Swiss bank, and Lombard Odier, are just two examples. There are dozens of such banks using these structures in Switzerland and by no coincidence; they have avoided the worst of the credit crunch. These banks are typically for the rich but it seems to me that there is no logical reason why such an approach could not be used more widely. So there are different ways of doing banking right now. And do not forget the humble UK mutual building society: they have their limitations, but as a business model they had a lot to recommend them.

Another objection might be that the debt-for-equity swap way of restructuring failed banks under bankruptcy protection laws would be politically unfeasible, since depositors would be hit. I understand that, but Professor Dowd is not trying to imagine what sort of reforms would appeal to David Cameron, say, but what sort of reforms would be workable. That is a rather massive difference, as I am sure readers will agree.

Another objection is that “real money”, as opposed to the state-arranged fiction that we have now, cannot work for as long as governments take such a large slice of GDP. That is probably correct. One of the reasons why so many advocates of Big Government regard “gold bugs” or free bankers as dangerous nutters is that they realise their welfare states would be unworkable under such monetary arrangements. The Ponzi schemes of most welfare states would not be able to function. Even so, as long as governments retain the ability to tax, they have the ability to raise debt in the financial markets in the knowledge that their collateral can be collected at the point of a gun. But a real-money system still hampers such activity considerably.

In the longest run, the best hope of avoiding such financial disasters in the future is to wean the public and policymakers off the seductive delusion that one can create wealth by turning on a printing press. Sooner or later, if you try to fake reality, it bites you hard in the arse. Of course, it is a mark of the kind of man Professor Dowd is that he is too polite to put it as bluntly as that.

I await comments!

Comments

It sounds all very interesting and I really wish now I had been there as the other event I was at did not afford me the opportunity I had hoped to grab my local Oxfordshire MPs and try and sell them my idea for a “Bank of Oxfordshire” using, believe it or not, partnerships and asset based scrip.

I particularly like his ideas about what to do now, practically speaking, because I guess I always focus on the “hereafter” policies of competitive currencies and so on which are probably still a bit far up the Overton window for most peoples’ comfort.

There was an interesting piece about C Hoare & Co in one of yesterday’s newspapers just so people recall that there is at least one UK based bank on an unlimited liability model.

Was any mention made of Gesell, WIR Bank and similar alternative structures that often started up in the Depression and some of which, such as WIR, are still going from strength to strength?

Posted by Jock at March 19, 2009 02:05 PM

Firstly thank you for organising an enjoyable evening and thought provoking talk.

One additional area that will be critical to moving in the direction of free banking is reform of the insolvency laws and procedures. However desirable it may be to put a bank into an enforced reconstruction the law, particularly in England, makes it impossible to complete in a realistic time scale. The timescale for advertising ceditor claims, the lack of sufficient powers of an administrator to cut a deal amongst creditors and make it stick without protracted legal action, and the absence of any legal recognition (in statute or precedence) of priority for the counterparties of many of the new financial instruments mean that any administration process under current law would take months or probably years to resolve. A bank will go under if the uncertainty lasts more than a few days.

Sorting out the legislation and enforcing the current competiton rule to break up the major banks into more managable units will be preconditions of Prof Dowd’s approach.

A further and slightly off topic thought. The Sarbanes-Oxley laws in the US require CEO’s and CFO’s of companies, including banks and other financial institutions, to sign declarations that their organisation has fully effective internal controls, the records are complete and accurate, and that the financial statements can be relied upon. Clearly these representation for AIG, Citibank and other were patently false. Why are there no CEOs and CFOs in handcuffs awaiting trial??

Posted by RobertD at March 19, 2009 02:16 PM

It certainly appears to have been an excellent talk; I look forward to seeing a video of it.

Johnathan’s summary mentions two points which I think could be implemented fairly quickly and do much to improve on the current system: repeal of “legal tender” laws and elimination of deposit insurance. The former is fairly straightforward and explained in the article. The second bears more discussion.

Deposit insurance (in the US, anyway) is an artifact of the Great Depression, installed to prevent catastrophic “runs” on banks, sometimes sparked by mere rumor. It was (and is) a legitimate concern, and while the problem is exacerbated by a fractional reserve system (as I’m sure Paul will interject here at some point), it would also be a problem even without fractional reserve lending. The US’s solution was to create a new federal agency (the FDIC) to run the insurance fund, and (not coincidentally) directly regulate most banks. Therein lies the flaw.

The FDIC is staffed by government bureaucrats with no personal economic stake in the game. They are, by and large, decent and well-meaning people, but they aren’t the “best and brightest” (such people don’t work for bureaucracies) and they are hampered by hidebound rules and a lumbering, ineffecient and inflexible system. Insurance “premiums” are not established on any actuarial basis, but are essentially identical for all banks, however well or badly managed [1], and setting the rate is quite politicized. The proper response should be to use private deposit insurance.

With private deposit insurance, banks could shop around for insurance companies with the best rates and service. The insurance companies themselves would more accurately and carefully assess “risk” than it would ever be possible for the government to do, and would price accordingly. They would set capital levels which make sense given the specific nature of the bank’s business (rather than one-size-fits-all rules), assess the true value of its assets and liabilities (including, where appropriate, off-balance-sheet contingent liabilities), and in general do a better job of assessing the because it is their (and their shareholders’) money which is at risk. If the FDIC misprices, the insurance fund gets depleted and they go to the government for more money. If a private insurance company misprices, its capital gets depleted and shareholders replace the management. Competition among insurance companies would keep any from becoming unduly risk-averse in their regulations or expensive in their pricing. It’s a true free-market solution, and would work.

[1] There has been a move in recent years to incorporate some sort of “risk-adjusted” element to the premiums, but if this has actually been implemented (I’m not sure about that) the differential was essentially nominal.

Posted by Laird at March 19, 2009 04:28 PM

RobertD, you make a good point about the speed of administration process under existing English law. Prof. Dowd made the point that the debt-for-equity swap and recapitalisation of a bank would have to be done very fast, over a weekend. A long delay would be a disaster, in particular, because of the need for businesses etc to make payments and handle invoices, etc.

Laird, thanks for the detail on the insurance angle.

Posted by Johnathan Pearce at March 19, 2009 05:01 PM

I am delighted to see articles like this posted on Samizdata Jonathan – excellent, more in this vein as and when you can please.

Posted by mike at March 19, 2009 05:19 PM

This is the problem I see with insurance: How can an actuarial table be constructed?

Do bank failures follow a known statistical pattern? Clearly not.

I wouldn’t believe any private agency offering deposit insurance. Gold reserves are all that can be believed. At least until an actuarial table can be constructed.

Posted by Current at March 19, 2009 05:23 PM

Two questions:

1. As Laird pointed out above, the bank guarantees were specifically made to avoid panics, wouldn’t the removal of these guarantees necessarily cause panics? With the advent of instantaneous communication available to even the stupidest among us, wouldn’t ‘runs on the bank’ become a regular event?

2. Fiat money v. asset backed currency -
With fiat money there is a good deal of leverage that is not possible with the asset backed. This seems to imply that under a asset backed regime the economy would be significantly less dynamic one, and growth could be curtailed. Yes, a blessing in the possible smoother booms and busts, but it would seem a curse in reducing growth, productivity.

Looking at the historical rates of inflation / deflation it really appears that prior to the 1930′s, this cycle was much more dynamic than after: (UK) Consumer Price Inflation Since 1750(Link)
I realize this study is a reconstruction and I have no way of evaluating the methodologies but it seems relevant.

Posted by Will Anjin at March 19, 2009 07:26 PM

This isn’t life insurance; there are no “actuarial tables”. That doesn’t mean that the risks can’t be rationally assessed. How do you think an insurance company insures any one-time event? Lloyd’s has known how to do this for centuries (even if they’ve fallen off course a bit lately). [I need help here from someone with better knowledge than mine about probability; is this a Bayesian analysis?]

Moreover, the real point isn’t whether there is going to be deposit insurance; that’s a given, after the experiences of the Great Depression. The only question is who provides it, and at what cost? I submit that government is the least qualified entity to do so, for a variety of reasons (some noted in my previous post). In a truly free market each bank would decide whether to offer it or not and the market would reward or punish that decision, but even in a regulated environment the government could simply mandate that banks carry some minimal level of deposit insurance as a condition to maintaining their charter. Banks could choose to carry more than the minimum amount, and again the market would determine whether or not that was a wise decision, but it’s still a market solution. (Probably a market would develop for banks with different insurance levels: minimal for those with relatively small balances wanting cheap banking services, higher for those with more money who are willing to pay a bit more for peace of mind. Let the market sort it out.)

Posted by Laird at March 19, 2009 07:36 PM

Chris R. Tame Memorial Lecture, by Kevin Dowd, at the National Liberal Club


Sean Gabb

I’m currently sitting in the National Liberal Club in London, getting ready for the second of our annual lectures. Tim and I did think we’d have about fifty people. In the event, we have over a hundred. Once again, therefore, we’ve had to close the list. The fire regulations do not allow any flexibility above a certain number. Unless you have told us you are coming, therefore, we cannot take any more names.

The lesson of this, if you are disappointed, is that you should not expect that you can just turn up at Libertarian Alliance events without warning. Despite the looming recession, we can still pack out the Liberal Club, and must still be strict with latecomers.

We shall publish a written text of the lecture by Kevin Dowd – which is to be all about the financial crisis and the recession, and how these were brought on by a useless, state-regulated banking system –  and I will video the whole event and make this available on the Internet.

I hope for an interesting and enjoyable evening.

Best wishes to all,

Sean

Denying AGW is mental disorder – official … and Bella Gerens added


UPDATE:- Bella Gerens added to blogroll. An important recent omission corrected.

David Davis

My attention was drawn kindly by Martin, on a comment on this post, to the fact that I may be “psychological” (as my mother use to trumpet to me year-after-year as a boy) being as I am a AGW “denier”. It also says so in The Landed Underclass, so there’s clearly no hope for me.

Here’s the links to the event if you want to go along:-

One. (Christopher Booker)  

Two. (The University concerned.)

Clearly, I will have soon, very soon now, to be “admitted” to a Government Health Farm, to be treated for my errors, until such time as I see the error of my ways and am thus fit for execution.

Truly, one is so sorry, and also one apologises hyper-profusely, to The State, to the UN-IPCC, to Al Gore, and to all the other godlike people and august bodies (who all have no thought but that for our good) for spoiling their day by deciding they’re completely mistaken and incidentally a load of thieving, grasping, knowledge-corrupting GreeNazi scumbags, who want to kick the rest of the world except themselves back into the Endarkenment.

Right said Fred (in “Harriet Harman, British State-Lynch-Mobdriver v. Royal Bank of Scotland plc Contracts Department”)


David Davis

It says in The Landed Underclass that The Telegraph says that the “government” is “prepared to change the Law” to stop Sir Fred Goodwin getting his contractually-agreed pension. Just look at this terrifyingly dangerous utterance:-

But Ms Harman, Labour’s deputy leader, said that all necessary steps would be taken if the 50 year old would not do the “honourable” thing. (my emphasis – ed.)

“Sir Fred should not be counting on being £650,000 a year better off as a result of this because it is not going to happen,” she told BBC1′s Andrew Marr show.

“The Prime Minister has said it is not acceptable and therefore it will not be accepted. It might be enforceable in a court of law this contract but it’s not enforceable in the court of public opinion and that’s where the Government steps in.”

Ms Harman declined to say exactly what action could be taken but reports this week have suggested a special Act of Parliament was being considered by Downing Street as a last resort.

It is a dangerous thing, that any government, after Magna Carta, does not have respect for Law. Talk of “public opinion” and “The People” is always a dead-giveaway about Nazis lefty tyrannical tendencies.  All outfits that behave in this way should be treated as deeply suspect nasty fascist lefty Nazis.

Sir Fred Goodwin, although probably as culpable as any trough-pigging banker who dined out for years on States’ funny-money, is entitled, as a Sovereign Individual, to keep what free contracts have allowed to him. Specially as Guido has pointed out that Lord Myners knew about it in advance and the sums involved are nugatory.

This is a clear case of shamelessly but unjustifiably trying to take the high-moral-ground, but the thoughpiggers of ZanuLieBorg – who have pissed away the money, and also incidentally robbed millions of people of hundreds of billions of their own, fully-legally-obtained, and paid-for, “private pension pots”, to pay for a clientariat-votariat for themselves.

We all now have to work till we die. Sir Fred’s £700,000 is the least of our worries. I hope he gets a highly-paid job with the IMF and screws Harriet Harman (metaphorically – I for one would not even “escort”  her, if she paid me.)

Very bad NASA satellite launch failure…..why?


…because we will not now get the truth in time.

David Davis

The global-climate-change-Gramsco-MarxiaNazi-buggers, and their   _very_   close friends who are the starvation-driving-mass-people-slaughterers, will not now be faced with the evidence – which is that Man is   _not_   causing “global warming”. Thye have cleverly scuppered the satellite – and can simultaneously discredit what ordinary people call “rocket-science”….so that it’s for them a “one-stone-solution to a two-bird problem”.

As regards rocket-science, they will be able to sya how inept we all are, and should stay here and subsistence-farm with chicken manure and stuff.

As regards “global warming”, they will be able to say that “the Science” is “still settled”, for there is still “no” evidence for their hypothesis being proved not to be true.

See?

Simple really.

You just do the insurance-equivalent of setting your car on fire, to claim the dosh and pretend it was all right anyway.

Czars, inept stalinist-collectivist western governments, and spin. Who will over-Czar the Czars?


David Davis

I had been wondering about this very problem for some time, until I came accidentally across this post on Manhattan Capital. I have no clue what Manhattan Capital is generally about, but if they are scurrilously ironic about today’s Western (should be but aren’t) liberal governments and their fixation with “appearing to do something about” “problems” by appointing “Czars”, then they are on the right side.

I couldn’t resist reprinting it:-

Über Czar to be Renamed

By Jennifer Kerfuffle, Universal News Co, Feb. 11, 2008. 1.1PM

The Federal Agency for Renaming Solutions, which is working overtime to find a more attractive title for the bank bailout program TARP, will also tackle the task of renaming the Czar Czar—the Czar that rules over all other Czars. 

The office of the US Czar Czar was recently created to oversee the exponentially growing army of czars appointed to control all aspects of existence. The czars are being given distinctive names, such as Autocrat for the Car Czar, Munarch for the Municipal Bond Czar, Bail Boss for the Bank Czar and Morticia for the Mortgage Czarina. 

“Our staff is working 24 hours a day searching for appropriate names,” said Snaky Mox, the director of FARS. “These are very complex issues for which there is no precedent, so we need to be free to make judgment calls along the way.”

One possible new name for the Czar Czar has cropped up in the blogosphere, where several stories were posted to the effect that FARS has already decided on the new title, which is to be Cza Cza Gabor. 

Ms. Mox said she cannot comment because new names have to get security clearance before they can be made public. She says malicious clones are spreading rumors that are not true, such as the rumor that the Space Czar is named Captain Kirk. FARS announced yesterday that the Space Czar will in fact be named The Great Big Head. 

Libertarian Alliance Bulletin


Director’s Bulletin
14th February 2009
Introduction
Libertarian Alliance Publications
Media Appearances
Speaking Engagements
Libertarian Alliance Events
Libertarian Alliance Book Recommendation
Libertarian Alliance Conference
Negative Scanner Needed

It is cold. I am working hard to finish a book before April. My Baby Bear is now running about the house with more hands than the average Indian goddess. The other Officers of the Libertarian Alliance are also busy. Even so, there is something to report.

Our first publication of 2009 is Anthony Flood, Is Anarchy a Cause of War? Some Questions for David Ray Griffin, Philosophical Notes, No 81
http://www.libertarian.co.uk/lapubs/philn/philn081.htm
http://www.libertarian.co.uk/lapubs/philn/philn081.pdf

Our Editorial Director is working on several other publications at the moment, and we expect to bring out at least as much in 2009 as in the past few years.

While on the subject of publications, I will take the opportunity here to announce to the whole world what I have been telling people for several years in e-mails of response. If there is anything published by us that you want to republish, on the Internet or in hard copy, please feel free to do so. We do not ask for payment. We do not require to be asked in advance, or to be sent copies of republished material. In return for this general licence, we ask the following:

  • That the Author and the Libertarian Alliance should receive full attribution in any republication;
  • That the Author’s words should not be edited to bring him or the Libertarian Alliance into hatred, ridicule or contempt;
  • That if a work is republished by any organisation that normally pays for material, the Author should receive fair payment.

I am on the radio sometimes three times a week. Sadly, I am usually too disorganised to record the event. Here are details of the only two recordings I have been able to make this year:

4th February 2009, BBC Radio, “Was the BBC right to suspend Carol Thatcher for racist language?”
http://www.libertarian.co.uk/multimedia/2009-02-04-sig-thatcher.mp3

I wrote at some length on this issue in my essay “On Golliwogs, One-Eyed Scottish Idiots and Sending Poo Through the Post“, available at:
http://www.seangabb.co.uk/flcomm/flc180.htm

12th February 2009, BBC Radio, “Was it right for the British Government not to admit Geert Wilders to show his anti-Islam film?”
http://www.libertarian.co.uk/multimedia/2009-02-12-sig-islam.mp3

This one needs a little explaining. Geert Wilders is a Dutch politician who has made a film that claims Islam to be an intolerant religion. He was supposed to come to England last week to introduce a showing of his film in the House of Lords. However, after protests and threats of mass protests by various Moslems, the Home Office told Mr Wilders he would not be allowed into the country.

The BBC is a pro-ruling class propaganda organisation that masquerades as a public service broadcaster. This usually means that it will support the Labour Party on any issue. When it thinks it can get away with it – for example, in claims about “climate change” – the BBC will openly lie and then refuse to give airtime to dissenters. In other cases, it will set up token debates that can be waved at anyone who complains later about bias, but that do not allow opposing points of view to be fairly put. My 12th February debate was of this second kind. A lawyer who is also a Moslem and a woman was allowed to speak about three times longer than I was. She was able to claim without any pretence of hard questioning that Islam was a religion of love and peace and that this was evidenced in The Koran. She insisted that the Gert Wilders denial of this was deeply offensive to Moslems and that his film should be banned.

I was finally allowed to make my response, knowing that I might be cut off at any moment. I made two rapid points: first, that modern public order laws are a blank cheque to anyone able to put a mob on the streets; second, that if this woman wanted to live in an Islamic state, she should consider moving to Iran or Pakistan. I added that, as a woman lawyer, she might get the occasional bucket of acid thrown in her face, but would never have to feel upset about her faith.

Why do I take part in these Potemkin debates? I do so first because they sometimes turn out to be real debates. The BBC is an increasingly totalitarian organisation, but not every minute of airtime is yet controlled. I do so second because, however compressed or bluntly, it is possible to utter truths that the listeners might not otherwise hear. The listeners, of course, already know the truth. But it can brighten their day to hear it put from within the lie machine itself.

Sadly, while I am in continual demand for programmes like Drive Time Cumberland, I am never allowed on Question Time and hardly ever on Newsnight. Such, however, is the nature of the BBC.

I have agreed to speak at the following meetings:

Monday, 16th February 2009, 7:30pm – Conservative Future meeting, Westminster. I will probably denounce the Conservative Party. If I do, I shall certainly receive a polite hearing. The difference between the two main parties in this country is that Labour is evil in root and branch, while the Conservatives are just too stupid to understand what has been done to us since 1997. I think this is a closed meeting. If not and you wish to attend, you should contact Lauren Mc Evatt <lmmce86@hotmail.com>

Sunday, 22nd February 2009, 2pm – Marlborough Group meeting, The Town Hall, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 1AL. I will speak about the need for conservatives to bear in mind that all the things they have defended for the past hundred years have now been destroyed or co-opted, and that conservatives must start to think how conservative values in the future can be embodied in what may have to be a revolutionary settlement. If you are interested in attending this meeting, please contact Robert Francis <remfrancis@googlemail.com>

Thursday, 26th February 2009, The Oxford Union. I shall oppose the motion “This House Would Restrict The Free Speech of Extremists”.I think these meetings are restricted to members of the Union, and I do not know if they are recorded. But I am to speak at one.

Tuesday 17th March 2009 between 6.30pm and 8.30pm – The Second Annual Chris R. Tame Memorial Lecture and Drinks Reception, at the National Liberal Club, One Whitehall Place, London SW1 (nearest tube Embankment). Professor Kevin Dowd: Lessons from the Financial Crisis: A Libertarian Perspective. Full details at:
http://www.libertarian.co.uk/conferences/crtmemlec09.htm

Society for Individual Freedom

I often refer to the Society for Individual Freedom as a “sister organisation” of the Libertarian Alliance. Since the LA is actually a breakaway organisation from SIF, it is more correctly our mother organisation. Whatever the case, its quarterly magazine, The Individual is now out. You can find SIF at:
http://www.individualist.org.uk/index.htm

My very dear friend, Richard Blake, has now had his second novel published by Hodder & Stoughton. The Terror of Constantinople has been received with universal applause. You can buy copies from Amazon at http://tinyurl.com/bgx5a2. You really should buy a copy – preferably two or three dozen copies.

I also recommend the following from Civitas: Nick Cowan, Total Recall: How Direct Democracy Can Improve Britain, Civitas, London, 2008. This is one of the few Civitas publications that I can wholeheartedly recommend. It suggests radical democracy as a cure for the New Labour dictatorship. You can order it from Amazon at http://tinyurl.com/c93jr6

This has been set for the last weekend in October 2009 at the National Liberal Club in London. As yet, we are unable to make any announcement regarding speakers or subjects. However, bearing in mind the continuing economic collapse, we have decided for a second year to keep the conference fee at the old rate of �85. So many of our friends have now lost their jobs and are facing hard times in the year ahead, that we feel obliged to dip further into our reserves to subsidise the conference. Do stand by for more detailed announcements.

I have several thousand negatives from the Chris R. Tame collection of photographs. I want to have these scanned in for upload to the Internet. Is there anyone out there able and willing to lend me a good negative scanner?


Sean Gabb
Director, The Libertarian Alliance
sean@libertarian.co.uk
Tel: 07956 472 199

http://www.libertarian.co.uk
http://www.seangabb.co.uk
http://www.hampdenpress.co.uk
http://libertarianalliance.wordpress.com

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Labour “Peers” and “cash for law changes”: the buggers get off.


Of course they will: whatever did we suppose?

David Davis

There are two nations now – firstly, the one the Enemy Class inhabits (see Dr Sean Gabb’s site for further clarification of these buggers) into which there is Active Transport of money, up a very very steep Concentration Gradient.

And then there is the one they chain us in  – fenced in by cameras, terror-police and DNA databases, where the money is produced, and from which it is extracted, as if we are their farm animals.

At least Old Holborn has said something about this sad matter. Everybody else seems as bored as we are.

New sound blog added: http://hetvrijevolk.com/


UPDATE:- It’s Dutch. I processed it through Google.

David Davis

I’m ashamed to say I haven’t much of a clue what it’s saying – it could be either Dutch or Flemish – but it seems to be an inocming link so it’s been added to our bogroll.

Daniel Hannan lays into (state-funded) fake charities


David Davis

Here. Though the credit for arguably the first fully public attack on what Sean Gabb has for long now called “Big-Charity”, ought to go to the Devil.

(Update: The Devil thinks Dan was actually first, which suggests a correction: I don’t mind either way so long as someone’s making a fuss. See comments below.)

Stalinist filename 3578-A/b-crat-5z.NHS.dll : “National Dementia Strategy.rtf”


David Davis

You have to wonder what the mindset is, of persons who link together these three words. “National” + “Dementia” + “Strategy”. It makes me think of dudes who work under the Ministry, in Richard Blake’s new historical novel, “The Terror of Constantinople“, to be published by Hodder & Stoughton on this coming Thursday (5th Feb 2009.)

“I thought that “national dementia” was something invented and posthumously exploited by “Princess” Diana, and then algorithmically-developed and extended by slebs and also by Peter Bazalgette, until I read the DT today.

You have to wonder what a “dementia czar” would look like, or do in his office. As regards what the Libertarian Alliance thinks about czars, we have two things to say:-

(1) We approve of czars IF and only _if_ they are autocratically appointed within and for private organisations, in which environment those who disagree are free to leave, _and_, importantly, the appointing agents are free to dismiss the czar at any time.

For example, I, the editor of this blog, am the LA Blog Czar.

(2) We disapprove of czars as they are commonly employed these days: which is to say, as used by the British State to act as fall guys and take the blame create spinnable headlines for ZanuLieborg by ordering other less powerful robots about so that it looks in the MSM as if something is being done about some intractable problem that the State has compulsively taken on.

There is something profoundly paradoxical about the left’s use of the word “czar”, considering its masturbatory obsession with the theoretical idea of democracy as it imagines what it persists in calling “people power” to be. I’d have thought that the very concept of “czar” – both as derived from the word “Caesar” which came to mean “Emperor”, and from its Imperial Russian connotations, ought to be in the same token profoundly distasteful to the Gramsco-Marxians.

Perhaps we ought to devil up a list of czars. Here’s some:-

Tech czar

http://www.boingboing.net/2008/07/29/uk-techczars-ridicul.html

it-theft czar

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/10/08/id_theft_czar/

drugs czar

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article1184845.ece

children’s czar

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2005/nov/13/childrensservices.pupilbehaviour1

the “crime czar” wants us all to stop calling children “yobs”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2005/may/22/schools.ukcrime

and here’s sovereignty, which has already spotted thr tyrants of triviality:-

http://www.sovereignty.org.uk/features/eco/czars.html

and it looks like the Yanks have got a touch of Czarrhosis of the whatever, as well:-

http://artblog.net/?name=2009-01-26-08-07-czar

More moolah on “Cash for Laws” – see posting below.


UPDATE1:- Raedwald agrees, and says what the four buggers’ anticedents are.

David Davis

Guido Fawkes is of course right that (some) ordinary people assume that the  current British State legislature is entirely corrupt. The trouble is, there are not enough ordinary people to make much difference any more. Most people are extraordinary in that they watch the “News” on the Wireless Tele Vision at best (which as we know is Hello-magazine-like and unhelpful), read no News Papers – and so can get no non-centrist-cosensual-non-controversial-PC-views -  and indulge in no critical thinking as a result of that.

Reality-TV (an oxymoron) is too gripping.

We’ve been here before many times in our history. But it does not make this time any better. For your opportunity to throw rottin cabbages at the Hamiltons, please see the post below, where comments about them are accumulating and it will increase the value of the thread.

Used cars! Used cars!

Used cars! Used cars!

And this guy looks like he’s just out of “uni” – what does he know about the right behaviour when one is lording?

Play “Bail Out Brown” online


David Davis

Here

Courtesy of Guido. And here’s a piece for us, by Kevin Dowd, on the coming inflation.

Dunno what we’d do without the Devil


David Davis

Here he is in good form on MPs’ expenses thieving. it actually raises the question about how, if at all, MPs and indeed all other “representatives” ought to be remunerated. here’s a poll:-

Libertarian Alliance Blog: snapshots now disabled … unless you all object.


David Davis

I have had a commplaint from the blog’s reader, about those hovering-snapshot thingies. He/she’s told me how to turn them off, so now they’re off.

Is this true?


David Davis

From The Remittance Man we learn this: householders will be visited by bureaucrats dispensing advice (here’s the original source) about cooking with leftovers…..

Sometimes we here, on whichever of the duty-typwriting squadrons is on “watch”, are tempted to emulate the language of Obnoxio The Clown, or the Devil himself. (He’s uncovered a previously unstudied State-Bogus-Charity in that one…Obnoxio’s latest just refers to some bureucrat or other as a c*** . )

But this is a family blog, so, apart from saying shit and crap which is rather weak playground stuff now, we only go so far as to merely write f*** (sometimes even c*** these days.) And also we only show pictures of Keeley Hazell wearing bras (until we get bored with her and we go and get someone else. Possibly Lucy Pinder – anybody got any preferences? See poll below. If in doubt, go here and select someone else.)

To get back to the point, the government is bust, the main world’s private banks have feverishly bought themselves into virtual bankruptcy by queuing for 15 years to buy each others “securitised” pigs-in-pokes, Gordon Brown is printing money….and then they all go and spend it on what? Food-police. Here’s an exerpt:-

Home cooks will also be told what size portions to prepare, taught to understand “best before” dates and urged to make more use of their freezers.

The door-to-door campaign, which starts tomorrow, will be funded by the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP), a Government agency charged with reducing household waste.

The officials will be called “food champions”. However, they were dismissed last night as “food police” by critics who called the scheme an example of “excessive government nannying”.

WE MUST ALSO BEAR IN MIND THAT THIS IS ! “ALL ABOUT PROPERTY RIGHTS” !  People who have purchased food are entitled to dispose of it how it pleases them. The bought food DOES NOT become State Property: it belongs to the householder.

No bureaucrats yet come round to tell you not to throw a brick at your Wireless Tele Vision, thus rendering it at least partially if not fully unserviceable, whenever Jonathan Ross come on screen: why should they come and tell you what to do with food whiche displeases you?

It’s all very sad: it’s as if the poor government buggers just can’t kick the gravy-train (sorry) habit, even when there’s really no money, as opposed to just the appearance of no money.


Slash parliamentary seats: good idea. Get rid of Labour “rotten boroughs” entirely….


…and ensure the right kind of permanent majority. (UPDATE:- It will also save a very very large sum, many millions, in “MPs’ expenses”… HAH !! )

HOW TO build a minimal-statist Britain from the bottom up:   part 3,142A/5  :-

David Davis

The first thing you have to do is abolish the concept of “safe” Labour seats in “inner cities” and the “Celtic Fringe”. I expect the Scotsnats can be relied on to demolish Labour in Scotland eventually, and then we can cut the place adrift unless it wants also to leave the EU with us -  but we can help by amalgamating small slum seats with few voters and lots of “constituency activists” who forge ballot papers and rig postal votes, into large slum seats with the same original number of activists, some of whom will get demoralised and piss off onto the dole (which we may stop) and so whose remainder will have less proportional effect. The voters will be less proportionally-well-represented, but for the time being most of them will not give a f***. They will still have their Foot Ball, and their flat screen wireless tele visions.

In line of course with “progressive” policies, while doing the above, you could get your Tory activists to “encourage” individual voters to “engage with the defining issues of Modern Britain today“, thus “individually aiding their ability to focus on the delivery of appropriate franchise policy“.

In the Bedford Conservative Association -  many, many years ago, we just called this “collecting old ladies and driving them to and from the Polling Station“, but the policy could be extended creatively.

The second thing you should do is what has been proposed here.

You could also vote for the LPUK, wherever it stands in forthcoming elections. It is making a pretty good stab at formulating a minimal-statist manifesto that makes sense. It is also the nearest thing we will get, being practical and realistic, to a limited-statist government in the next couple of hundred years.

Interesting thought about libertarians…..


…..here.

David Davis

And God saw what man had done in his hubristic wind/fart-turbine-ness, and lo, He Was Wroth


David Davis

And yea, verily did God smite the false turbines in His Anger, to teach Man a lesson about “fossil fuels” which God had Laid Before Man Without Let Or Hinderance.

And God said: “Men: why hast ye pandered, in despite of my strictures and manuals (RTFM) to the energetics of the Devil, when all you saddo buggers had to do was pump out of the ground the stuff I furnished you with?  C***s. “

I’m sure that actually it’s due to the Flying-Spaghetti-Monster.

I now know what “Twitter” is, and what “Twitterati” are.


David Davis

I learned it here, although I expect I will score “nul points”, since Bryony Gordon was my source, and she was slightly less positive about it than the Twitterati might like, and I’m a bit cynical too.

Who cares what I’m doing right now? Or even what you are doing, reader. Piss off back to your work. Perhaps it’s none of anybody’s effing business either.

I would like to publish in a few years:-

“They spotted a gap in the market, and fell smartly to their deaths through it.”

(Reheated) I should have thought that the answer is obvious


David Davis

Editor’s Note: this was published on 4th January 2009, at the height of the “New Labour” GramscoFabiaNazi Terror. A rather strangely forbidding and humourless man called “Jacqui Smith” was the Interior-Minister…I think. This person liked to state on the wireless-tele vision that people would come up to him in the street and ask when they could have something called an “identity card”.

The current lot in power, the LabLebLibLobLubCon “coalition” have done less than one hoped to reverse the creeping tide of police-terror overcoming us here.

The prospects for liberty in the UK continue to remain poor.

Philip Johnston asks “why is Labour so keen to imprison us?

So were Lenin, Stalin, Hitler, Castro (who will continue to remain dead, thank God) Kim Jong-Il, Mao, Ho (ho ho) Chi Mhinh,  and the rest. I bet that if you asked ShootinPutin187 how many people he ought to imprison, then his list would be longer than mine or yours.

The only people to imprison are those who seriously violate, beyind the bounds of sensible argument, people’s natural Rights, which are to one’s life, liberty or justly acquired property. This could include a large and increasing majority of British politicians and bureaucrats, psychologically egged-on but not necessarily overtly supported by, those in the EU.

Given that these people-troids – the British ones anyway – spend a large percentage of their time manufacturing (on purpose) petty criminals who violate life and property directly, such as robbers, muggers, burglars, rapists, car-keyers, knifers, ne’er-do-wells and rievers of all types, by purposefully designing “school” “syllabuses” which selectively disadvantage young boys and men, then these troids are the people who ought to inhabit prisons first and for the longest times. I designed a prison a little while ago, just for them. Here it is again.

As it gets colder, and sterling becomes toilet-paper, we shall be glad to be able to have chip-butties.


David Davis

I have even met builders, with whom I worked a bit last summer as a second-fix trade-polisher on a housebuilding job, who had crisp-butties for their tea-breaks (many.)

The Landed Underclass tells us, I am happy to relate, that the Vegan stuffed vine leaves are off in 2009 because of Sterling’s continuing fall. I can’t say I’m very sorry about that, although I do like stuffed vine leaves, preferably full of a nice lemony mixture of minced lamb, rice, pine nuts, coriander and other poncy (but scrumptious) Wireless Tele Chef type comestibles. However, his main point is the most cunningly marvellous exposition about foods in general by a proper doctor, the kind who knows about war and stuff. We’d all really prefer to get treated by guys llike that whom he describes, if push came to shove: and not the sneering hectoring sub-types of “professionals” like State “dieticians” whom I met in a certain famous children’s hospital not 30 miles form here, a few years ago when our new-born (now five) was rather less well than he orta-av-been.

The problem arises of course where the State, whether nanny, jackbooted or otherwise (I can’t tell the difference) steps in. I quote from landed’s quote from the Daily express:-

Tam Fry of the National Obesity Forum said …: “As prices rise and incomes fall, people will be drawn to the cheaper, less healthy processed foods, which are precisely the sort of things we are trying to wean people away from. Once habits change, it becomes hard for people to go back, especially because cheaper junk foods are so seductive.”

I have not previously heard of the “National Obesity Forum”, but I bet it’s (a) not a national movement and (b) it’s anything but a forum in which people engage in civilised discourse.

The libertarian issues are as follows:-

(1) If people are to be “weaned” off certain foods, and forced to eat others which they desire  less, then they are the state’s farm animals. I do feel quite sure that this is what “Tam” “Fry” does truly intend, although he’d not see it like that. he’d be “helping” people. Like Stalin did.

(2) If there was a real market in food, then the price of Vegan stuffed Vine Leaves would reflect demand and also the affluence (or otherwise) if the clientele that would go for it.

First they came for the cars, and I didn’t speak out, as I was not a car….


….then they came for the drivers.

David Davis

I am old enough to remember the introduction of the “Ministry of Transport ten-year-test” for cars. About 1960 or ’61 I think….A mechanic in a boiler suit regarded your car, kicked the tyres, wobbled the steering wheel, tried the brakes, and then gave you a chit. I was 8 or 9 and didn’t think anything sinister into it. Look at the same test now, and extrapolate to what the buggers will do to “test” drivers’ fitness in say 2030…..

Now they come for the drivers…and it’s all dressed up in the usual concerned-parent-type panguage of nanny.

The result will be to ground people who vote Conservative, since these are all elderly, having experienced life and come to the logical conclusions. Just watch the buggers get everyone but bureaucrats off the roads.

It does not matter a monkey’s f*** whether the meme-crazed control-freaks in Westmonster think they are trying to make the world’s safets roads safer. Or, even if we lived in an Upper-Jipoopooland-like maze of death-traps and drug-hazed half-blind drivers. the principle is a wrong one.

Very important


David Davis

Nuclear fusion possibly around the corner…a hundred years or so?

It’s soon enough but nowish would be better, to silence all the global-warm-Nazis… so they HAVE TO resort to their guns after all, and their open hatred of Mankind…..before they are really really ready and truly in charge.

Internet censorship coming soon….


….from Andy Burnham, the bust TV channels, and the Onebama…

…but The Landed Underclass has the right idea here.

Harry Haddock at “A nation of Shopkeepers” is more hard-hitting. Wish I’d had the foresight this morning,  to say what he does.

David Davis

This morning the Quislingraph led early with news of proposals to “give Internet Sites Cinema-Style Ratings”, which is of course newspeak for the first steps in censoring the internet, probably via state pressure on ISPs.

Guuido Fawkes, always with a nose checking the wind, has already made plans to move his site out of vulnerable jurisdictions, such as the UK and USA.

This is coupled with earlier tentative threats from the EU and from someone called Hazel Blears, to “regulate” bloggers (which States do not like) – this basically means Classical liberal and libertarian-leaning ones I expect. Once this power and the one flagged above are in place, Gordon Brown and his new accolyte the Onebama will be able to trumpet that they’ve done it all “for the children”. The Quislingraph piece is a classic screed of socialist caring-nonsense, dripping with parental concern which gets the sheeple nodding vigorously in agreement (we all love children don’t we?) while yet shrouding a terrible threat in the subtext, which next to nobody will pick up.

Again, once in place, i wonder which political parties a State will force the ISPs to proscribe? Obviously the BNP will go down the road of invisibility first, it being the State’s main left-wing competitor and also fully-corporatist, for mass franchise support. I expect UKIP won’t fare much better, and it will take some time for the buggers to catch up with LPUK, but they will, they will.

If “major ISPs” cave in and refuse access to sites deemed “unsuitable for children”, then “Best Practice” will inevitably be followed. You won’t even be able to get Wikipedia or Google, since this is unavailable on the LANs of most British State schools – and I dread to think how we’ll get ot Youtube.

Does anybody know how people get round this sort of restriction in places like China, Iran and Pakistan?

Liberty and tyranny: what non-violent and legal things could everyone do, every day, to upset and rile bureaucrats and “big-States”?


David Davis

I confess: the idea is not mine. Sean Gabb and I were discussing, in our inimitably pessimistic way, earlier this year, what kinds of things ordinary Subjects of the Crown could do, in their daily lives, to either annoy or make more difficult the lives of our political masters and their more lowly appointees.

The provisos were that:-

(1) We should try not to cause criminal damage. So 30,000 builders in 10,000 White Vans with 20,000 Stihl-Saws at 02.00 am GMT, all cutting down the posts of the speed cameras at one moment in time, will NOT do.

(2) We should not physically harm or otherwise assault bureaucrats, Ministers, MPs, their families, and the like. I recall that we could not decide what to do about “Traffic Wardens” or “Artificial Policemen“.

Please could ALL readers suggest something in the comments. Some things I can think of:-

(1) ALWAYS be seen to be filming the officers of the State, or else pretend to photograph them, while they are going about their “business” – even if you are not so doing. We all now carry little peanut-sized-thingies that not only film stuff but phone people, make tea, tell you whree you are etc. It is not (yet) a crime to make privaye movies in public places. this will increase their “workplace stress”, and with a bit of luck some of them will clock off “sick”. We will not be any the worse thereby, even though they still cost us.

(2) Place “Britain is leaving the EU: it is inevitable” stickers on State notices of all kinds. Also on the rear number plates of “official cars” and the like. Or, over the bar-code on their tax discs. This will cause inconvenience when the vehilces pass through ANPR camerae (now believed to be live) and does not cause any damage as they wash off.

(3) Place small but ostensibly accidental amounts of the wrong recyclable material (such as a large rusty steel automotive pressing like a flywheel or a Brake Disk,  into a plastic box for beer cans) into any State Receptacle designed for another sort. If what they say is true, this renders the entire bulk amout later, useless.

(4) ALWAYS ( or affect to ) smoke in the presence of a State Employee, ideally inside a building or a car (it becomes a “workplace” if there are 2 or more of you in it!) or if not, then in your house or on the street.

I would welcome lots more suggestions. I want 100 good ones by Christmas, to cheer you all up with on a special “ANNOY A BUREAUCRAT FOR THE CHILDREN AT CHRISTMAS” post………………..

Libertarian Alliance Christmas Book Recommendation: A good read


David Davis

The English translation of this recently published novel, “Conspiracies of Rome” – written by Richard Blake, a dear friend of ours of course (else why would it be on here?) – is a good read.

Buy it now....sequel also nearly available

Buy it now....sequel also nearly available

Cuba and showing the world how to live: a window, or a wind-up?


David Davis

Here it is. I can’t tell. You decide. “Particularcuba”…weird. I spotted it using a thingy called alphainventions, which shows you loads of weird blogs about all sorts of inconsequential stuff which does not matter a monkey’s toss, but some gems also, now and then.

Like mining, really.

Sean Gabb, Director’s Bulletin, December 2008


Director’s Bulletin
9th December 2008
Introduction
Book Recommendations 1
Book Recommendations 2
Libertarian Alliance Conference
Eton College
Media Appearances
Negative Scanner Wanted

Introduction

I will begin by wishing a Happy Christmas to everyone who celebrates these things, and a Happy Holiday Season to those who don’t. You can see my personal card here: http://www.seangabb.co.uk/christmas.htm

Book Recommendation 1

Richard Blake, who is a very dear friend of mine, has now published his first novel in Italian. La Cospirazione Papale. This has already received a most flattering review by Marian Halcombe. I urge all my Italian readers to go out and buy copies of this novel. It will make an excellent Christmas present for any Italian interested in how an Englishman sees his country in the seventh century. And Mr Blake promises that, unlike certain other popular novelists, he will never give a million pounds to the Labour Party. You can order your copies here: http://tinyurl.com/567q47

Book Recommendation 2

I have discovered another box of my own first novel, The Column of Phocas. This means that after a year of being unavailable, it can now be offered again to the public. Again, it will make an excellent Christmas present for people who already have everything else. You can order copies from me directly at http://www.candidlist.demon.co.uk/hampden/phocas.htm All orders received will be sent out the same day. Again, I can promise that not a penny of the proceeds will go to the Labour Party – assuming, that is, the British State is not nowadays simply the executive wing of the Labour Party.

Libertarian Alliance Conference

This has been set for the last weekend in October 2009 at the National Liberal Club in London. As yet, we are unable to make any announcement regarding speakers or subjects. However, bearing in mind the continuing economic collapse, we have decided for a second year to keep the conference fee at the old rate of �85. So many of our friends have now lost their jobs and are facing hard times in the year ahead, that we feel obliged to dip further into our reserves to subsidise the conference. Do stand by for more detailed announcements.

Eton College

On the 19th November 2008, I spoke about libertarianism to the Shelley Society at Eton College. I had always thought of Eton as a place where the boys were stuffed at night into cold and filthy dormitories and flogged all day into learning how to write Greek iambics. It is actually a most impressive place of learning. The boys were all polite, and they asked me some very interesting questions. How so many members of our ruling class emerged from here as thick as they are is a mystery.

Media Appearances

I have done about a dozen media appearances in the past month. Sadly, I have only bothered to record two of them. This is most remiss of me, I accept – indeed, which writing this, I was called by a Christian radio station and asked to comment on the Government’s further steps towards banning tobacco. I made my comments without recording them. The recorded appearances are:

My debate with Lord Levy on the 19th November 2008. This went out on BBC Radio 4′s PM programme and was heard by millions of people.
http://www.libertarian.co.uk/multimedia/2008-11-19-sig-lester.mp3

A comment on the Queen’s Speech on Talk Sport Radio from the 3rd December 2008.
http://www.libertarian.co.uk/multimedia/2008-12-03-qe2speech-sig.mp3

Negative Scanner Wanted

I have several thousand negatives from the Chris R. Tame collection of photographs. I want to have these scanned in for upload to the Internet. Is there anyone out there able and willing to lend me a good negative scanner?


Sean Gabb
Director, The Libertarian Alliance
sean@libertarian.co.uk
Tel: 07956 472 199

http://www.libertarian.co.uk
http://www.seangabb.co.uk
http://www.hampdenpress.co.uk
http://libertarianalliance.wordpress.com

FREE download of my book – Cultural Revolution, Culture War: How Conservatives Lost England, and How to Get It Back
Wikipedia Entry

Libertarian Alliance home

Barnyard animals and tyranny: the role of the British State in the downfall of liberty.


David Davis

(1)

Did they turn us into barnyard-animals by public-culture-degradation and removal of schooling, in order to be able to tyrannize us overtly with our consent, so as to show that the idea of wanting Liberty can then be destroyed inside a Free People?

Or…

(2)

Did they destroy the idea of Liberty, in order to turn us into their barnyard-animals because they are pre-capitalist-barbarians, and wanted to have some animals to shag?

The question does vex me often. Either way they are wicked. here’s a poll:-

Via the UK Libertarian Party…


Sean Gabb will speak at the Oxford Union. We had already flagged this much earlier but it’s worth repeating, and also plugging our friends.

I don;t think Sean resembles the totty on the frontispiece of this youtube thingy:-

Interesting idea…libel insurance for bloggers?


David Davis

But if the stalinists, whom we blog about, are actually such astonishingly wicked people (they are) who deserve to be exposed and have rotting stuff thrown at their faces while they are in the Pillory, why then might we need to insure ourselves against their (unjustified) retaliation?

Why can’t socialists and other fascist abusers of other human beings just

(a) go home,

(b) shut up (you’ve lost)

(c) quietly contemplate your cow-bladder-gasbag lovinly sewn (slowly) by candle-light by your drugged hippy partneretta, filling (slowly) with chicken-shit-methane (and hydrogen sulphide while your back is turned) on your subsistence-farm in Wales,

(d) keep the hell out of discussions about how the world’s poor are going to better themselves?

Did Christianity sort of “let them in”? Is it our fault? Where did we go wrong? In the midst of all this plenitude of scientific, technological and liberal philosphical richness, how did the bastards get a foothold?

If what we say about them is true, can’t they just square up and duel with us on-line, just as any self-respecting ordinary petty-criminals, thugs and murderers would do so to our faces?

Or do they NEED the “law”, as their case is vulnerable to their own dangerous isolation from reality and their pan-global lack of support?

One of the unseen benefits of the internet is that truth cannot be quickly suppressed. this surely is an advantage – our enemies are for ever going on about “truth” – let them eat it.

Valve amp coming along nicely


David Davis

A couple of weeks ago you got this progress report. Here’s where we are now. Transformers are bolted down, most holes are drilled, and all the heaters light up.

Click on either to get a larger image. Owner is coming later tonight to view progress. Better get on with building the driver-stage electronics, and digging out those 33K and 22K ceramic Erie carbon resistors I promised him. All original NOS carbon resistors (non-inductive), hard to find now in new condition.

As I said before, I will make you an identical one of these (different meters, as these are the last two ex-WW2 vintage RAF ones) for about £5,000-£6,000, depending (on this and that.)

Or you can have it with Chinese or Russian 6L6 output valves and a less elaborate chassis (almost the same power as with KT88 sets, but slightly more “edgy” sound, for modern tracks and guitar riffs) for about £2,500 all-in. You’d have to come and collect as these are too heavy to post or courier.

Although the world is sinking into the New Socialist Dark Age: although Gordon Brown seems somehow to have recovered his popularity: although the pig Putin is loved and adorated in Russia the USSR: although Huggy-the-Chav is ruining Venezuela*** (why is not anyone assassinating him?) and although the naive stalinist Obama seems set to head up destroy the planet’s most important collection of (300 million, astonished) individuals, there is still fun to be had.

***I can be as rude about him as I like, since Dread-Ken is no longer Mayor of London.

This is where the Udenopticon will be


(NB! The videos refer to the populated Berneray – not the uninhabited one which was originally intended!  – Blogmaster.)

David Davis

Do you remember when I suggested what would be done with captured socialists, other similar fascist-lefty right-wing scum, bureaucrats (same thing), stalinist Wireless Tele Vision “Tycoons” and the rest of the Enemy Class who would not beg to break stones and heft bricks in our nirvana? Well, here it is. Berneray…but I changed my mind later:-

Actually, now I think about it, Berneray is too flat, too benign now, too near other islands, and has people living on it, and actually looks quite civilised. There are even roads and live buildings and quite nice houses (all of which would have to be ruined first before turning it into a prison for lefties.) I will put the buggers on St Kilda instead:-

The irony of its status as a “United Nazis Nations World Heritage Site” will not be lost on the new, albeit slightly unwilling, inhabitants:-

It’s a pity really, that it’s not further away from us than it is. I suppse we could put them on South Georgia instead (see below) but there are two issues: (1) They are too far away to have a cheap eye kept on them and be serviced with daily rations, and (2) fascist idiots like the Soviets Russian Government might try to “rescue” them while our back is turned one night.

MAGNA CARTA will be signed tomorrow, 15th June. Bookmark it today.


David Davis

 It is of course a disaster of Cosmic proportions, that no such event will happen tomorrow, in this year of 2008.

We are descending into a new Dark Age, and at present I cannot see what can be done about this. It’s the faulr of liberals, for being asleep while pre-capitalist Gramsco-Marxian “Liberals” took over the Universities, the Schools, the State (which was previosjly fairly minimal and declining in power) and the Levers of power. These people, being social misfits and hankerers-after-an-imaginary-arcadia-of-smiling-peasants-and-benign-overlords, have never had any attachment to the (actually-achievable) ideal of individual liberty in an environment with no observable tyrant present. The very idea of such a document as Magna Carta being conceived, let alone signed by a ruler, must be alien to them.

And while I mix our Gin-&-Tonics, here’s some faintly cheering news for the poor persecuted Cubans


They can now buy PCs….but they still can’t get on-line (it’s all George W Bush’s fault as is natural.)

David Davis