Author Archives: Without Prejudice

Blogging: everyone’s a critic (not)


by Richard North

Blogging: everyone’s a critic (not) Journalism – and especially political journalism – is about criticism. The meat and drink of the oeuvre is taking people, governments or other institutions to task, either for not doing things, for doing things, or doing them badly.

If they do things well, they are largely ignored. A functioning system doesn’t make headlines (although it might if we ever had a government IT system that worked). By its very nature, the media concentrates on “bad” news, and on criticism rather than plaudits. Continue reading

How the Czechs Deal with “Anti-Social Behaviour”


Once you’ve had a good laugh at this, you may wish to consider how other countries deal with nuisances without ASBOs and without turning the police into an army of occupation. The Czechs, of course, nowadays have a greater commitment to personal freedom and responsibility than we have. SIG

“Roger” Comments on Leaving the European Union


Transferred from Comments to main posting. SIG

by “Roger”

I have long been sceptical of UKIP’s commitment to a referendum. Suppose the Conservative Party scrapes its way back into office in 2015, gives us a referendum in 2017, and the British people vote to leave. What then? We will be outside of the European Union, but that won’t mean much if we have the same parasitical class of authoritarian social-democrats ruling over us. We will still have the Human Rights Act, the Equality Act, the Communications Act and a vast range of other laws codifying political correctness as state ideology. The Proposed New Independent School Standards came from our own ruling class, not from the marauders of Brussels and Strasbourg. People like Michael Gove and David Cameron are the ones who support the ideological encroachment of the state into private education, and their efforts would persist regardless of our formal relationship with the European Union. There are other EU countries which have no such problem and are not being forced by Brussels to clamp down on true independent schooling. Continue reading

Genetic Codes: Private Property Versus Public Goods


Genetic Codes: Private Property Versus Public Goods
Ingemar Nordin

Philosophical Notes No. 91
Published by the Libertarian Alliance, 2014

ISBN: 9781856376679

Ingemar Nordin is a professor of philosophy at the department of philosophy at Linköping university, Sweden, his field of research being political philosophy and the philosophy of science. Before that he did graduate studies in maths, physics and philosophy, gained a PhD in philosophy at the university of Lund in 1980, became Associate Professor in Philosophy of Science at the University of Umeå in 1986, and became professor at the department of Health and society in 2001.

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to make a case for the protection of genetic codes. It is argued that within a property rights (or “libertarian”) approach this has to be accomplished through having a copyright to the physical body parts and biological tissues one owns. It is also argued that copyrights can only be upheld if biological material is transferred or exposed to others in a contractual situation. Therefore extra care has to be taken when things like hair and blood is thrown or given away. Continue reading

The WHO Goes In To Bat For Big Pharma


by Dick Puddlecote
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DickPuddlecote/~3/f5i4jauXSlA/the-who-goes-in-to-bat-for-big-pharma.html

The WHO Goes In To Bat For Big PharmaWell, the World Health Organisation has finally come out of the closet and admitted that its Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC) is nothing more than a mouthpiece for the transnational pharmaceutical industry.

We’ve kinda known this for a while but it has always previously posed as being concerned with health by attacking tobacco. However, once again e-cigs have thrown a huge spanner in the works and the WHO has been forced to reveal its hand in the most shameful of ways. Continue reading

Traditionalist Conservatism


Traditionalist Conservatism
by Oscar Theodore

Hardly anyone has captured the spirit of authentic Traditionalist Conservatism better than the 20th century poet T.S. Eliot. He has been a profound source of inspiration for some of its chief proponents, including the American historian and writer Russell Kirk and the British philosopher and writer Roger Scruton. Eliot self-identified as a Classicist in literature, an Anglo-Catholic in religion and a Royalist (or Monarchist) in politics. These three elements are instances of dispositions which are at the core of the Traditionalist Conservative standpoint. These fundamental dispositions can be briefly stated in the following way: Continue reading

American “Justice” – Corrupt From Top to Bottom


by Paul Craig Roberts
http://www.lewrockwell.com/2014/08/paul-craig-roberts/corrupt-from-top-to-bottom-2/
Corrupt From Top to Bottom

Note: Nothing I hadn’t already come across in the legal journals, but a damning indictment of the American criminal justice system. What makes it particularly scary is:

a) Like everything else American, it is coming here. The Judges still disapprove of plea bargaining, but there is anecdotal evidence that some police forces and the Crown Prosecution Service are skilled in its ways.

b) Thanks to the unequal Extradition Treaty we have with the Americans, any one of us can be dragged off there to face trial on trumped up charges. This has already happened, and may happen more in the future.

Chris Tame always used to insist that written constitutions and bills of rights were irrelevant. Given a liberal order, they were unnecessary. Without a liberal order, they would be dead letters. Looking at America, I increasingly believe he was right. SIG Continue reading