Daily Archives: 28 December, 2012

A Nanny Looks Forward To 2013


by Dick Puddlecote
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DickPuddlecote/~3/lJXGXLhHwZg/a-nanny-looks-forward-to-2013.html

A Nanny Looks Forward To 2013 Sorry, I did try but just can’t let this pass without comment.

A government minister has written to magazine editors asking them not to promote post-Christmas “miracle” diets because they pose a “health risk”.

Equalities minister Jo Swinson wrote an open letter asking magazines to “shed the fad diets and fitness myths” in their January editions.

She suggested they “celebrate the beauty of diversity in body shape, skin colour, size and age” instead. Continue reading

The Story of the Mises Institute


http://mises.org/daily/6324/The-Story-of-the-Mises-Institute

The Story of the Mises Institute

[The Free Market, May 1988]

The Mises Institute comes at both economic scholarship and applied political philosophy from a very different perspective. It believes that “policy analysis” without principle is mere flim-flam and ad-hocery—murky political conclusions resting on foundations of sand. It also believes that policy analysis that does not rest on scholarly principles is scarcely worth the paper it is written on or the time and money devoted to it. In short, that the only worthwhile analysis of the contemporary political and economic scene rests consistently on firm scholarly principles. Continue reading

Social Democracy as High-Overhead “Socialism”


by Kevin Carson
http://c4ss.org/content/15835
Social Democracy as High-Overhead “Socialism”

Around a hundred years ago, guild socialist G.D.H. Cole argued that social democrats had made a major strategic decision not to contest the way property was distributed or production organized under corporate capitalism. Instead, they would limit their agenda to a (partial) equalization of the way the rents on concentrated property, the output of these institutions, was distributed.

One reason was that challenging the actual ownership of property would be politically impossible. But another reason, Cole suggested, was that the original socialist project of attacking the institutional structures of capitalism itself, and putting labor in direct control of the production process, would undermine the power of the managerial and professional classes who made up so much of the social democratic, Fabian and Progressive movements. Continue reading