If Google thinks it, it must be true…


But I’ve been saying it to whoever will listen, for some time.

David Davis

Eric Schmidt thinks the British “school system” (by which I take it me means primarily the State part) undervalues science, engineering and computing versus what he calls “the humanities”. Humanities apart – the study of which, if they are proper ones like joined-up-history, proper geography with facts, and languages such as Latin and classical Greek – if we simply got rid of vacuous rubbish like “Citizenship”, “personal, social and health education” (abbreviated to PSHE to simultaneously impress, frighten and exclude parents from objecting), and the pretentious self-regarding twaddle of forcibly-applied topics in “literature” (and poetry) from the English “syllabus”, replacing that with an own-time-reading library of proper English literature by dead white male authors, the time saved could be turned over to more proper science, engineering and computing.

Visits to steel-foundries, blast-furnaces, silicon-ship-fabs, wire-drawing factories, shipyards and textile mills would also immediately be re-instated.

AND, I do so wish that WordPress would refrain from this faux-matey stuff…“This is your 3,714th post. Slick!”

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5 responses to “If Google thinks it, it must be true…

  1. David, science may be downplayed in British schools (not engineering, as that is not a secondary school subject) – but computing? Computing is as mickey mouse a subject as it gets. Computing at the secondary-school level is just playing around on a computer and is a substitute for the real education, especially maths, that lays the foundation for a serious study of IT at university.

  2. David, “computing” as taught is as you say. I agree. But it need not be like that. From the age of eight, when children ought to be able to read English fluently and do elementary maths just as easily, Computing could be taught. Furthermore, Engineering could be taught as a serious subject from the ages of nine or ten, when children – specially girls – who are accurate, biddable and do homework, would be able to do competent Machine Drawing.

  3. Sounds a lot like education used to be, in the USSR!

    Tony

  4. C H Ingoldby

    ”Visits to steel-foundries, blast-furnaces, silicon-ship-fabs, wire-drawing factories, shipyards and textile mills would also immediately be re-instated.”

    I like that idea, although in most of the country there is a distinct shortage of such places these days.

    Most education in Britain is so pointless as to be actually counterproductive. It would be a fine thing for real skills and understanding to be taught. Having ‘citizenship’ and ‘media studies’ and ‘personal, social and health education’ taught at GCSE level is horrifying. It is a symptom of decadence as a civilisation.