Popsies and popularity


David Davis

About 2½ years ago, I got castigated on here by one or two rather self-righteous libertarians (they’ll know who they are.) I used images of a “young woman prominent in the public prints” to attract otherwise unsuspecting seekers-after-liberty on searches for liberal ideas. (It worked. Our daily hit rate went from about 500 to over 1,000 in short order.)

Today, Guido does it unashamedly, and gets 160+ comments in less than two hours. (His traffic’s a lot higher too.)

Well, I don’t mind at all.

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8 responses to “Popsies and popularity

  1. While gracious beauty can be a distraction from that which is greater, it is silly to get caught up in hypocritical judgements over something that is like salivating over the tuck box instead of going in to dinner.
    One of the things I like about the Spanish – they are beautiful and its no big deal. Enjoy.
    While the British have very many strong and admiral points, I think a cultural problem is a disassociation from inner peace and pleasure. It’s part of the reason they drink like idiots instead of in peace and to enjoy.
    And then put lots of foodie programmes on the telly to try and prove otherwise.

  2. Peter W Watson

    It’s Totty mate.

  3. Like I said . .

  4. Don’t worry, chaps. In a day or two, three at most, maybe, I’ll craft some earth-shatteringly philosphical pamphlet-piece, like what libertarians are supposed to be doing al the time.

    The trouble is, being retired and having no money in Post-Brown’s Post-Britain (I’d draw the line at Post-Modern – “pre” seems more appropriate) means you have to work so hard.

    But the memeory of the vituperation I got from one person in particular, resonates still down the months and years. You could be forgivein for thinking that I’d somehow mortally-let-down the Western Anglosphere Libertarian Movement single-handed. I would not mind so much if his blog got something like 10% of the readers that this one did and does.

  5. In my opinion, the person is question can go bil his head. The late Chris Tame would have said something much earthier. But this will have to do

  6. In my opinion, the person is question can go bil his head. The late Chris Tame would have said something much earthier. But this will have to do

  7. You know what I’m going to say…

    Oh, those puritans! Ignore them.

    I was just watching the wonderful series by the great Kenneth Clark, no not that one, the other one, “Civilisation”, which traces the history of our culture through its arts. And what a feast it is for the eyes.

    Until the Reformation, and those fucking fundamentalists roar through the churches smacking the heads off every virgin Mary they can find, smashing the windows, destroying everything of beauty. I am increasingly of the stark view that I wish there had been no Reformation (and Counter-Reformation) at all; that Luther had been dropped on his head as a baby and died.

    The root of all our problems, including the ridiculous fear of the female body, stems from there, I am convinced.

  8. Indeed, Ian, I thought that would be your point.
    But I think the problem lies with an Anglo Saxon urge to debase beauty, rather than any Reformation.
    The way the Gospel has been used to deny beauty and peace is a testament to the people who abused it rather than the actual contents.
    Luther, of course, did a good job at pulling the Gospel out of the political structure that had been built around it by Rome.
    But, it’s that Anglo Saxon rejection of beauty and graciousness that is at the root of what you would, I think, describe as Puritanical.