Monthly Archives: January 2011

Perhaps the soft-boiled-egg will now start to hit the electric fan


Michael Winning

I saw this on a comment over at Legiron (Underdogs bite Upwards.)

Blogger microdave said…

Glad to see you’ve linked to this article LI. The Mail comes in for a lot of flack, but this article should be compulsory reading in every household in the country.

@ junican – here are few quotes from The Green Agenda. If you had any doubts that this is one gigantic scam these should convince you.

“We need to get some broad based support, to capture the public’s imagination… So we have to offer up scary scenarios, make simplified, dramatic statements and make little mention of any doubts. Each of us has to decide what the right balance is between being effective and being honest.”
- Prof. Stephen Schneider,
Stanford Professor of Climatology,
lead author of many IPCC reports

“We’ve got to ride this global warming issue. Even if the theory of global warming is wrong, we will be doing the right thing in terms of economic and environmental policy.”
- Timothy Wirth,
President of the UN Foundation

“No matter if the science of global warming is all phony… climate change provides the greatest opportunity to bring about justice and equality in the world.”
- Christine Stewart,
former Canadian Minister of the Environment

“The data doesn’t matter. We’re not basing our recommendations on the data. We’re basing them on the climate models.”
- Prof. Chris Folland,
Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research

Plenty more here: http://green-agenda.com/

 

Richard Blake – News re Blood of Alexandria


My dear friend Richard Blake, the critically-acclaimed and internationally best-selling novelist, tells me that Slovart has just bought to Slovak rights to his “Blood of Alexandria.”

I do not think I can be accused of any base motive if I congratulate the Slovaks on their excellent taste.

You are to be directed to the Underdog


David Davis

Good one here about GreeNazis and FOE.

John Prescott in Money Supermarket Advertisement


Note: You may wish to adapt this for your own use. SIG

Darren Drabble,
Company Secretary
Money Supermarket
darren.drabble@moneysupermarket.com

Dear Mr Drabble,

I wish to protest at your use of John Prescott in your latest advertising campaign.

Mr Prescott was a Minister in the most treasonable and oppressive government in British history. Between 1997 and 2007, the Blair Government completed the transfer of effective power from London to Brussels. It sent our armed forces into unwinnable wars in Iraq and Afghanistan without legal authority and at the behest of the United States. It abolished freedom of speech and association and massively increased police and other state powers over the individual.

As an individual, Mr Prescott behaved in ways to his immediate staff that would get you the sack if you tried to copy him – sacked and sued and possibly prosecuted for criminal offences.

Using this man to advertise your business is a catastrophic public relations blunder. The moment I saw him in your television advertisement, I decided at once to stop using your service. There are tens and hundreds of other people in this country who will have been equally shocked and offended by your use of Mr Prescott.

Please immediately drop all advertisements that feature John Prescott. If you do not, it will be clear that the Money Supermarket supports treason, illegal wars, police state oppression, and sexual harassment in the workplace.

Yours sincerely,

Sean Gabb

For the Right, Freedom Isn’t Free — In Any Sense of the Word


by Kevin Carson
http://c4ss.org/?p=5951

We seem to hear the words “freedom” and “liberty” from some pretty unlikely sources.

Think back to the “liberty cabbage” of WWI — recently updated as “freedom fries.” The word “Freiheit” figured pretty prominently in Nazi propaganda; Nazi Minister of Propaganda Josef Goebbels started out as editor of Volkische Freiheit.

I usually don’t write columns about stuff on blogs, because I assume that if people reading a newspaper column were interested in inside baseball from the blogosphere they’d just read the blogs themselves. But in this case, I think Matt Yglesias states things about as well as it’s humanly possible to state them. Reviewing Tim Pawlenty’s latest political ad, which looks like something out of Paul Verhoeven’s version of “Starship Troopers,” he writes (“Tim Pawlenty and the Rhetoric of Freedom” Jan. 25):

“I continue to be fascinated by the way in which the rhetoric of ‘freedom’ is always so closely associated with authoritarian populist nationalist movements. Absolutely nothing in the imagery of the video or the policy agenda of the Republican Party is suggestive of freedom. It’s full of flags and grim-faced folks and bourgeois respectability and military jets flying in tight formation. It’s an ad from a conservative politician that’s about exactly what an ad from a conservative politician ought to be about — about preserving a way of life against Muslims, freeloaders, sexual deviants, and other threats.”

In other words, all images that would have been just as much at home in Nazi propaganda posters, in which the word “freedom” was so ubiquitous. For the Nazis, “freedom” was about a collective way of life — the right of the German people to their “place in the sun.” And for the American Right, “freedom” — in their idiosyncratic sense of a collective way of life — seems to be threatened mainly by other people being allowed to do what they want: Like people with the same sexual equipment being allowed get married, or people with unfamiliar religions being allowed to build places of worship.

In the Lee Greenwood conceptual universe, it’s unclear just what “freedom” is actually supposed to mean beyond a worshipful submission to all manifestations of uniformed authority — except perhaps for a bunch of stuff like baseball games and church picnics that not even Hitler was ever interested in actually stopping anyone from doing.

After 9-11, George Bush suggested shopping and other forms of public relaxation as a way to prove that “the terrorists haven’t won.” Because shopping at the mall, apparently, is the central sacrament in the religion of American freedom. But it’s hard to imagine anyone in the Nazi state objecting to any of the things that Bush celebrated as exemplars of “freedom.”

Can you imagine Hitler complaining about Germans spending money at department stores, attending soccer matches, or using public transit? Do you think that he’d grumble that they were “entirely too free,” and that something needed to be done about it? No, Nazi propaganda posters were full of imagery of happy Germans going about the very same kinds of daily activities to which Bush exhorted Americans after 9-11.

What would have angered the Nazis is precisely the kinds of things that the folks on right-wing talk radio object to today. Hitler would have frothed at the mouth over someone questioning the background of the Reichstag fire or the powers granted in the subsequent Enabling Act. He would have ordered the immediate arrest of anyone who publicly questioned the official account of events in Danzig as a rationale for invading Poland. He would have shut down any publication that challenged the power of the German national security state, the necessity of an expansionist foreign policy to “defend Germany’s freedom,” or the alleged “threats” presented various foreign powers.

It’s the stuff the people in uniform don’t want you to do that makes you free.

Blood of Alexandria – a Topical and Economical Read


This involves a desperate and bloody rising of the Egyptian mob against the established order. It’s ever so topical, therefore. And the Amazon discount makes it a bargain – a mere £3.49 at the time of writing. Buy now, buy often!

The Blood of Alexandria (Aelric)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blood-Alexandria-Aelric-Richard-Blake/dp/0340951176/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1296299437&sr=8-3

We drink because the climate is miserable, and because we’re told not to


David Davis

Ian B, a frequent commentator on this poor shambolic blog, has articulated what is possibly the main reason why socialism, and in its puritan calvinistic humourless form here in the Anglosphere, is so pernicious and life-threatening. he refers often to “Anglo-Socialism”, which I understand to be (correct me, Ian if I’m wrong) a mutated form of utopian idealism: this is one which calls upon the ordinary human instincts of helping someone over a bad patch, while adding the awful, European-Imperialist-Compulsive force of threats, burning in hell and even death for non-compliance, ultimately.

This stuff I just chanced on in a hurry in the Waily-Mail, but it highlights perfectly the sort of sniffy, high-minded tutt-tutting and censure of behaviours supposedly different from the Political Class (although I have my doubts there.) Furthermore, it is sexist: it implies that whereas “boys 11-15″ might binge-drink, it’s more “shocking” that girls should.

In my wilder moments, I’m inclined to float a new conspiracy-theory: that James Bazalgette brought proper sewage and clean drinking-water to “the masses” so that the Calvinist socialists could take away their alcohol. None of the “upper classes” would dare to drink water until at least this time.

Modern British boys and girls may well binge-drink (whatever that is: I suppose it just means they have had “several skinfuls”, as P G Wodehouse would say) because the Political Enemy-Class, through its media-brainwashing-arm, presents role-models who do just that and are deliberately well-reported as having done so – such as “foot ballists” and “celebrities”, in things called “clubs” – odd dark deafening places, with unfathomable names which are supposed to mean something “cool”.

The last “club” I entered was Annabel’s in Berkeley Square, in about 1988 (I think): it was before the days of credit-card-pin machines and one round of five drinks cost me £56.60….in cash: I made some excuses and left as soon as decency and politeness would let me. I can only imagine with horror the bills that today’s poor young people run up. A certain Tim Laughton MP was present in the party, who might be able to corroborate.