Idle parenting means happy children…but…


David Davis says it depends on the kind of idleness…

from Old Holborn.

If the parent or parents is/are (a) GramscoFabiaNazi creation via deliberate-scumbag-non-schooling, then perhaps not.

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2 responses to “Idle parenting means happy children…but…

  1. Karl Hess, Barry Goldwater’s speechwriter, was an anarchist, fiercely opposed to compulsory State schooling (indeed compulsory schooling of any kind). He got out of the system by getting a transfer note from a second school then not attending either: (each school thought he was attending the other one).

    American conservative Wm. F. Rickenbacker wrote a book “The Twelve Year Sentence” highlighting the fact that children were being incarcerated for twelve years in State institutions without having committed any crime.

    It was at school that my libertarian trophe flowered. I “won” a scholarship to a supposedly private school. Frankly, the place was disgusting. Karl Popper found his schooldays in Vienna unspeakably boring. He was of the opinion that provided kids learned reading, writing and arithmetic they could manage further subjects for themselves. It took me years to unlearn the authoritarian nonsense promulgated by Dulwich College.

    Most of the activity of most schools is to train kids to accept authoritarianism. With their paper credentials, the kids are prefabricated into building blocks for “society.” A more fully free society cannot be built on such a basis.

    Tony

  2. Steven Northwood

    I’d personally like my children to be at least partly home-schooled, perhaps with some part-time attendance for certain lessons such as literacy and numeracy and physical education. I think it gives the child the best of both worlds. I certainly see nothing wrong with challenging the norm regarding education, but I think more often that not the system also serves as a useful child-sitter for the average parent.

    I also see nothing wrong with a child aquiring their GCSEs or A-Levels at any point during their adolescence. If I had been granted such freedom, I would have aquired my A-Levels by age fifteen and would certainly have been working and supporting myself. It was the state structure and social convention which held me back.