God versus Science: something for the commentariat to argue about over the weekend…


David Davis

This just floated in from somewhere. Personally I see no problem whatsoever with Science co-existing with religious belief. Many scientists I have known were devout Christians.

I think we all ought to read 1.John (1 and onwards a bit) and ask what it meant.

But the fella relates a nice story.

Citizen Tom obviously thinks about stuff. I might go back from time to time and see. But for now, here’s what Keeley Hazell thinks. We will continue to employ her for now, inspte of Gordon Brown and his “end to Tory boom and bust”…

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12 responses to “God versus Science: something for the commentariat to argue about over the weekend…

  1. Dave:

    As Karl Popper would say: Science is done by Conjectures and Refutations. Corroborations cannot prove a theory true; but logical or testable falsification can show a theory to be untrue.

    “The statement ‘God exists’ has meaning; and may even be true. But since no conceivable observation could refute it, it is not a _scientific_ statement.’

    I think that Taoism and Henri Bergson’s ideas (the ‘Elan Vital’) have great merit. Religion is Mankinds earliest attempt at Cosmology — where we came from; what we’re here for; where we’re going.

    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=34UYddtwX-o

    Tony

  2. Beth Nielsen Chapman’s wonderful song

    “Sand and Water”

    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=5WUUMfadaBQ

    Tony

  3. Dave:

    Where has my comment gone??

    Best,

    Tony

  4. I haven’t deletd anything Tony!

  5. Dave:

    That’s a little weird! I entered a long(ish) post, and clicked on “Submit”. The Blog absobed my post, but did not display it. (Two other posts anished the same way).

    Still, like Mr. Spock, I can recreate entire Star Charts from memory, so here it is again:

    “The statement ‘God exists’ has meaning, and may even be true. However, since no conceivable observation could _refute_ it, it is not a scientific statement.” — Bryan Magee, ‘Popper.’

    As a Taoist and an agnostic fan (like Popper) of Henri Bergson, this is also my position. Religion represent’s Mankind’s efforts at Cosmology — where we came from, why we’re here, and where we’re going.

    Best,

    Tony

    PS: A number of my posts elsewhere have ‘disappeared’, some after ‘appearing.’ >:-}

  6. What’s a Taoist, Tony?

  7. You all right Tony?

    Wher -R-Ya?

  8. (As they say on phones these days….)

  9. Steven Northwood

    I think I agree Tony. From my perspective there’s really no need to ask if God exists, because the word or term ‘God’ exists in many different languages. It has meaning. As it stands it cannot be proven or disproven.

    I think it was Baruch Spinoza who said that God is revealed to all beings through the existance of the world, and all different religions are a response to this. Praying is an attempt of the self to reason with this revelation, nothing more.

    By far and away the most astute and scientific rationalisation of God I’ve ever come across anyway.

  10. Steven Northwood

    It’s also worthwhile to note that after Baruch, Dr Luther and all the others had put things into perspective, the only way for us was up.

  11. Dave:

    I’m OK — a bit weary from trying to solve all the world’s problems, is all.

    Rather than direct you to the excellent Wiki in Taoism (“The Tao that can be explained is not the real Tao”) I’ll offer you an excellent resource of original Taoism, the Daily Tao, translation by Jane English and Hua Quo Feng. With illustrations.

    http://www.daily-tao.com

    Taoism is an ancient Chinese way of experiencing and being in the world, which is simple, beautiful and very deep.

    It doesn’t ask you to believe “six impossible things before breakfast”. It’s very practical.

    As you ‘join up the dots’ in a Taoist way, the world comes to be seen and experienced as — enchanted. It’s very beautiful. And rich in wisdom and “connections.” David Carradine’s book “The Spirit of Shaolin” is a good way into it.

    Best,

    Tony