Monthly Archives: June 2008

Nearly bed-time, but I see that the Stalinist DEFRA anti-traders have struck again.


David Davis

They have struck here. What a bloody saddo shower of nerdy (no, not nerdy, just evil and wicked) these “people” are. How can we share a planet with these buggers? They do not see the world, and existence, through our prism.

I’d really, really, really, sometime before I die, like to know something. It’s this:-

What under Heaven is it, that causes otherwise outwardly human beings to (a) want a job like a “DEFRA inspector”, (b) actively go out and get that job (for it does not come to you, you have to want it and ask for it, like any other job) and (c) then go about joyfully “delivering consumer confidence” by threatening a retailer with bankruptcy or a criminal record?

Are there actually real, living, breathing human beings on this planet, nay, in this nation (worse) who are actively anti-Libertarian? And who actively torment others, using the force of “law” with the “it’s not our problme, it’s yours, matey” line?

Perhaps I really am autistic. Because I can’t understand why anybody would _want_ to behave, and would _wilfully_ (and in public) behave like these people?

OK, so a EU-directive says something? Disobey the f*****g thing, like everybody else. It’s what it’s for. The EU has corrupted the very idea of “law” so let’s just go with the flow and get on with our lives, get out more, and sell the kiwis whatever. Who cares, for f***’s sake?

Why not either let him give them away, if it’s so crucial (then all the “consumers” have lost is nothing at all) or sell them to poor people for less?

 

Subj: [eurorealist] Fw: EU rules ban sale of ‘too small’ kiwis 
Date: 30/06/2008 14:03:34 GMT Daylight Time
From: peter@pwwatson.co.uk
Reply-to: eurorealist@yahoogroups.com
To: EUroRealist@yahoogroups.com
Sent from the Internet (Details)

—– Original Message —–
From: “Bill & Ann Woodhouse” <office@tidemaster.co.uk>
To: “Ann Woodhouse” <office@tidemaster.co.uk>
Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 12:50 PM
Subject: EU rules ban sale of ‘too small’ kiwis

> If you tried to dream up anything so silly to denigrate our new
> government in Brussels, no one would believe you but complain you were
> instigating another Euro-myth. B&A
>
> http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2199214/EU-rules-ban-sale-of-‘too-
> small’-kiwis.html
> EU rules ban sale of ‘too small’ kiwis By Richard Savill 26/06/2008
>
> A wholesaler has been banned from selling a consignment of kiwi fruits
> because EU laws deemed them too small.
>
> Tim Down, a market trader for 25 years, said he was not permitted even
> to give away the 5,000 Chilean fruits, each of which is about the size
> of a small hen’s egg and weighs about 60g.
>
> Mr Down said his family run firm would lose several hundred pounds in
> sales because of the ban.
>
> “It is bureaucratic nonsense, they are perfectly fit to eat,” Mr Down
> said at his stall at the Wholesale Fruit Centre in Bristol.
>
> Inspectors from the Rural Payments Agency, an executive agency of the
> Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), made a
> random check on his stall, and found a number of his kiwis weighed 58g,
> four grams below the required minimum of 62g.
>
> Mr Down said that 4g in weight was the equivalent of about one
> millimeter in diameter.
>
> He said: “They (the inspectors) went through a lot of my stock using
> their own little scales.
>
> “These regulations are enforced in the United Kingdom with a higher
> level of rigour than is applied in mainland Europe. There is not a
> level playing field.
>
> “This fruit will now go to waste at a time when we are all feeling the
> pinch from rising prices.” He said there would also be the
> environmental cost of taking the fruits to a landfill site.
>
> Mr Down said he was not permitted by law to give away the kiwis to a
> school or hostel and faced a fine of several thousand pounds if he did.
>
> Barry Stedman, head of the Rural Payments Agency’s inspectorate, said
> the consignment had failed to meet the minimum standards for saleable
> produce, in contravention of EU grading rules.
>
> “The inspector’s decision is consistent with RPA’s commitment to
> protect consumers, who must feel confident that the produce they are
> buying is of the right quality,” he said.
>
> “RPA’s role is to work with traders to provide advice and assistance
> to ensure that this happens and to help traders carry out their
> business within the law.”
>
> The agency said Mr Down has been given a number of options, including
> sending the fruit back to the importer.
>
> The European Commission said recently that it wanted to relax the
> regulations which prevented misshapen or underweight fruit and
> vegetables being sold.
>
> The rules have previously banished curved cucumbers, straight bananas
> and skinny carrots.
>
> “The inspectors visit us on a random basis, probably two to three
> times monthly and select items at random that they wish to inspect,”
> said Mr Down.
>
> “The latest inspection took place subsequent to the announcement by
> the EC that the regulations are being modified.
>
> “We have had many items rejected over the years, but this, for a
> variety of reasons, is one of the most nonsensical.”
>

__._,_.___

Does anybody here know what this means?


David Davis

I find this picture staggeringly distressing, and I can’t fugure out why. Perhaps the poor terrified bird has just shat on the Headette-of-State’s hand?

Yes!


You can take that as agreement with the Devil, about this stuff here.

David Davis

The sooner the better it will be, when “politicians” are identified, by real-people, for what these things really all are: which is poor, sad, to-be-pitied candidates for some sort of charitable outdoor-relief-system which channels their energies in a harmless and civilisation-enhancing way.

One which gives them meaningful, useful and mind-improving-work to fill their days (such as growing organic produce by hand, within … a two-hour bicycle-ride … of its place-of-consumption) plus emotional comfort and shelter to cover their nights.

Their lives will then gain meaning, and will be followed in their satisfied Old Age (NOT our Dark Age thank you!) by Christian burial in Consecrated Ground (as befits the innocent and harmless intellectually-challenged among God’s creatures.)

I had thought that they could perhaps build a bridge over the Bering Strait. But on second thoughts they are perhaps better to be shielded from real problems, which they could only make worse, and learn to grow turnips instead…

Thank you, Devil! You said it first.

 

 

David Davis, liberty, the stalinist-surveillance-state, and reading for a Sunday afternoon


David Davis

Here’s some fun stuff:-

  [eurorealist] Fw: Truly extraordinary times!! 
Date: 29/06/2008 08:30:33 GMT Daylight Time
From: terry.pendrous@btinternet.com
Reply-to: eurorealist@yahoogroups.com
To: eurorealist@yahoogroups.com
Sent from the Internet (Details)

Received this from an expatriot who lives in New Zealand!
Terry Pendrous
Sent: Sunday, June 29, 2008 8:22 AM
Subject: Re: Truly extraordinary times!!

Left supports Right defending liberty

By Tony Benn
Last Updated: 12:01am BST 29/06/2008

Libertarians from the Left and Right sometimes meet in the middle against
an authoritarian state. In 1961, having served for 10 years as an MP for
Bristol South East, I was declared disqualified because my father had been
a peer and he had died. It was argued that I had inherited his peerage.

A by-election was called, and, despite my disqualification, I decided to
contest it to argue a point of principle. Winston Churchill, the former
Conservative Prime Minister, sent me a letter of support for which I am,
this day, most grateful.
I must be the only Labour candidate who has ever circulated 30,000 copies
of a letter from a Tory leader to my constituents. The law that prevented me
sitting in the Commons was later changed as a result of that by-election. So
when I heard that David Davis was standing in the Haltemprice and Howden
by-election, I decided to support him. I hope the Government’s move towards
42 days’ detention without charge, recently passed in the House of Commons,
will be stopped as a result of his campaign. The civil liberties issues on
which Mr Davis stands are important to the future of this country. Last
Friday I attended a conference organised by Lincoln Cathedral on Magna
Carta, an original of which they hold. Magna Carta had nothing to do with
democracy, but one phrase in it has registered worldwide: “no man shall be
taken [and] imprisoned. except by the lawful judgement of his peers.”
For many years the Labour government has boasted about the traditional
values and freedoms of this country; and yet, when its MPs voted to amend
the Terrorism Act and permit 42 days in prison without charge, they
effectively repealed Magna Carta. Such a law would mean that people could be
imprisoned for six weeks, then released without charge or trial but also
without ever being properly acquitted: a cloud of suspicion would remain.
It is also clear that anyone released after such a period would almost
certainly find their life destroyed, with their job lost and real risk posed
to any prospect of future employment.
There are two other critical ways in which liberties are being eroded,
both highlighted by Mr Davis. The first is identity cards. I have no
objection to them in principle,
because in the course of my life I have held many cards with my photo, name
and profession printed on them. What matters more is the huge database being
established in concert with ID cards, on which will be gathered every bit of
information that it is possible to collect. It may contain your financial
status, political opinions, email contacts and more – no one will really
know what is on that database.
Indeed, the information held may be inaccurate. When I recently renewed my
passport, I noticed that I am still described as a Member of Parliament.
If the Government does not know that I am not an MP seven years after I
stepped down, it does not inspire confidence that a more wide-ranging
identity database would be very reliable. The information may leak, and it
would be valuable for commercial and other purposes, including fraud and
terrorism. Despite the guarantees of
ministers, and regardless of whatever safeguards are promised, we know from
recent examples that information held by the Government can escape. Second,
the Lisbon Treaty diminishes the sovereign powers of British democracy,
which belong to the people and are lent to MPs. MPs have no right to dispose
of them to the EU.
The Irish have defeated the Lisbon Treaty democratically, and Britain was
denied a referendum on the Treaty only because it was clear that the
Government would be defeated on it here. Because the people are sovereign,
governments get their powers from us; we do not get our rights from them.
This issue is becoming crucial because the centralisation of power to
political elites is a threat to our freedom and democracy.
The Haltemprice by-election is taking place because Mr Davis gave up his
seat and possible position in any future Conservative government to seek his
contituents’ verdict on these issues.

The fact that the Labour party has decided not to contest the seat
indicates that it knows that it cannot win the argument on 42 days. I
believe that Mr Davis’s stand may do something to restore public confidence
in politics and politicians. If, as is expected, he wins, it will confirm
the judgment he made on the 42 days and will also destroy the argument that
the public really supports these oppressive measures. If the Lords, as
expected, also rejects 42 days, it would be a constitutional outrage to use
the Parliament Act to enforce the will of the Commons on the second
chamber.
It is on the single, but vital, issue of civil liberties that I decided to
support David Davis.

__._,_.___

 

More progress regarding the “Mouse that can’t get cancer”


David Davis

We reported this a while ago, under “The mouse that can’t get cancer”. Now, in today’s dead-tree-copy of the Sunday Telegraph there is a report that human tirals will shortly be used on transfused granulocytes, a variety of lymphocyte, that appears to be involved. I can’t find the online link to this yet.

As and when this is found to work, as I think it will, it’s probably too much to hope that the England-despising liberal-haters of the NhS and “N.I.C.E” (a good acronym) will allow people to be treated using it.

No blogging today, saving the world instead.


David Davis

I have to mow the lawns, and also build an amplifier for a man. Then I am working tomorrow Sunday 29th, so I may possibly hand down some Godly per-oration (on Sunday 29th June) pm but I don’t yet know what, so I don’t promise anything yet.

It does rather depend on what aspects of applied Gramsco-Marxianism (as applied daily by the British State to the people which are elected and dismissed periodically by it) that I decide to be irked by on the day. I may even then write about it, and about what ought to be done with the buggers, to ensure their re-socialisation as individual human beings living in a Market Civilisation.

BUT…………………………….

If you want a Rolls-Royce-version of a Williamson Amplifier, for your Hi-Fi, or if you would like a couple of single-ended 300B monoblocs, then talk to me. I will build them for you, by hand. And, you will love them.

Here are the comments on the BBC website, about Gordon Brown’s first year in office.


Most of them hope it’s his last, but that’s a vain hope. (Dark Ages etc.)

Here.

Strong language from the start….see my earlier post here.

A Libertarian Government of the UK will arrive to find many problems to fix. Of course, the first one will be to (a) take away or destroy all political machinery which could ever be used by ANY party (especially socialists) to regain control of people’s lives, and (b) deprive socialists of any Nazi persuasion, which is all of them, of the ability to proselytize or organize.

The following bit is censored: Ordinary people are all in favour of free speech, but not where it means the ability to deny the use of words, language and thought-forms to others (see “political correctness”.) Libertarians may here disagree with my “Boromir” moment, but there may be an instant where we have to “take the ring”.

Returing to reality: I would like a Libertarian Administration to not have to do those things which I described in the above (blue) paragraph. It is non-Libertarian, which is the point that Tolkien was making, by using Boromir for a very important purpose. But the central problem for Mankind to be able to proceed form here, rests on not being burdened, ever ever ever ever again, by collectivist Utopians and their pre-capitalist-barbarian nonsenses.

These buggers must accept, publicly, for many many years until all are gone, that they are useless wastes of space, with ideas which don’t accord with reality, and which nobody wants to follow. “The Science is Settled” – after all, they said it, not us. If they are very good and submissive and consent to either perform second-order-partial-differential-equations in front of students at circuses, or break rocks in the Pamirs on wireless tele vision, (they will be fed and clothed!) when paid so to do, then we will feed them and pay them.