Sean Gabb, talking about “OBESITY” in the BBC – interesting comment


David Davis

I don’t know anything about this idea, but it sounds interestingly plausible. Would any bloggeeks who inhabit this place like to give it “peer review”?

G E Alderson

(the above is where you can go to talk to the guy who commented what follows):

The Government are taking advice from a section of the medical profession who (as Prof. Mann’s review has determined) has a 99% failure rate. We had an obesity incidence in, say, 1960 that occurred in ‘NOCTURNAL HUNTER PHENOTYPES’ who inadvertently overate when eating in daylight.

With the diet of 1960, the ‘DIURNAL HUNTER PHENOTYPE’ eating in daylight did NOT overeat and become obese.

NOW there has been a significant (for the HUNTER PHENOTYPE) change in the British diet.

On an exponential curve (I think he’s being a bit hyperbolic here – no pun intended! – Ed.) over the last 40 years or so, the SOURCE of the fat content has switched from FAUNA to FLORA. The metabolism of the HUNTER PHENOTYPE does NOT recognise FLORA fats when swallowed (at any time of day) and therefore nowadays the DIURNAL version (still eating at the correct time – daylight) are inadvertantly overeating FLORA fat and gaining weight increasing the INCIDENCE of obesity.

REVERSE the fat source switch and not only do the DIURNAL stop overeating and therefore gain no more weight, the position could not be better. Any weight gained through inadvertant overeating which is designated by the body as ’surplus to requirements, is AUTONOMICALLY REMOVED via thermogenesis in Brown Adipose Tissue. This is the theoretical explanation of the Atkins weight loss but it is NOT necessary to avoid the carbohydrates.

The HUNTER PHENOTYPE perceive FAUNA fats to ‘taste nicer’ than FLORA fats. Until the medical profession decided to ‘demonise’ animal fat, this taste prefernce was enough to keep the HUNTERS shunning the FLORA fat as it began to arrive and take its place in the British diet.
The ONLY thing that is needed is to tell the food industry that they must use a ‘Hunter friendly logo’ that guarantees the food has a fat content that is entirely from a FAUNA source with NO FLORA fat content. The STORK TASTE TEST of about 40 years ago (6 out of 10 ‘can’t tell Stork from butter) gives a ‘ballpark’ figure of approx. 40% of the British population being HUNTERS. The food industry SHOULD be willing to produce this food when they are informed that the GPs are about to tell 40% of the population to only buy food with this logo.
When the CORRECT advice is to tell people to eat food that they will find ‘TASTES NICER’ than what they are currently eating (once this food becomes available) that is advice THEY WILL GLADLY FOLLOW.
They do not need to take any exercise unless they want to. The ONLY other thing they need to do to let the weight loss occur AUTONOMICALLY is to wean themselves slowly (to avoid withdrawal symptoms) off caffeine.
The DIURNAL HUNTERS, as a generalisation will ignore all this current advice anyway but will continue to get fatter (some dangerously so) due to the omnipresence of the FLORA fats and the ever diminishing FAUNA fats in the current diet.
The full theory is available on serious request.

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12 responses to “Sean Gabb, talking about “OBESITY” in the BBC – interesting comment

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  3. Okay, so I’m a natural skeptic (I can never remember if that’s supposed to be a “c” or a “k” btw) and I naturally laugh in the face of cranky internet theories promoted on poorly crafted websites like “Einstein is wrong” and “Global Warming” but despite that I have to admit I’m attracted to Ms. Alderson’s speculation.

    That’s because I seem to fit her “nocturnal fauna” category rather well. I naturally run to a “late to rise, late to bed” body clock; if I rise in the morning for some reason for a while, as soon as that reason goes away my clock slips forward until I’m getting up after noon, but then it sticks and it’s a heck of a job getting it back to “normal”. I’ve always been like this.

    Also, I’m primarily a carnivore. For me, a meal is meat, lovely meat, preferably roasted or fried, with some other green stuff I feel obligated to eat. I adore animal fat and indeed part of my Rage Against The Machine regarding the current state imposed health faddism is that the state corporate food purveyors are steadily trimming off all the tasty fat from their meat and other foods; luckily I have a farm shop nearby that still sells meat as nature intended.

    And I don’t eat during the day. Other people find this weird (it’s difficult with girlfriends, it really is). I have a drink for breakfast and then don’t eat until after dark, when I have a big meaty meal, which is frequently my only food consumption of the day. Indeed, I really dislike eating during the day, it just doesn’t feel “right” somehow.

    So maybe I’m a nocturnal fauna person.

    Of course, what I’ve just said isn’t science, or even evidence, it’s just anecdote. But I’m intrigued nonetheless.

    Also, David, could I request that you stop formatting quotes in giant multicoloured type? It looks like shouting, it’s difficult to read and frankly it looks a bit amateur league. Multiple sizes of Times New Roman in multiple colours is what we were all doing on the web in 1995. Nowadays some tasteful verdana with some <em> tags around it for quotes or <strong> tags for bold are the way to look with-it and professional, kind of thing. Typography can win readers or send them fleeing to other blogs…

  4. In fact you could even use <blockquote> tags, come to that :oD

  5. Of course the obvious fly in the ointment here is that neither of my parents seem to be “nocturnal hunters”. So maybe I’m just a bit weird.

  6. …but my sister’s a night owl who loves meat and fat, so maybe each of our parents had recessive hunter alleles, Mendel and all that.

  7. Don’t mind me, I’m just talking to myself because there’s nobody else around, y’know?

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  10. Hi Ian, my dear fellow! Glad to see you try to force yourself to read this stuff regularly in spite of the fact I don’t know jackshit about html or even about “computer programming”. My son knows 100,000% more than me but is busy with teenage stuff these days. He’s learning C so he can write and animate games and gamesprites, and he’s threatening to redesign the LA website. :-(

    I would love to learn more about how to prettify this blog. It is rather plain and I am restricted to what wordpress is pleased to give us as “buttons”.

    But if it did get redone, I think i would keep the hard, bright-and-cold, ascetic look overall.

    It suits our deep sense of pssimistic righteousness, and the feeling that all politicians do is a mixture of vanity an fathomless cruelty.

    As I know nothing, but have to drive a blog all the same, I have to make do for now!

  11. Ian:

    Einstein’s “Special Relativity” was ‘born refuted’, by Absolute Rotation.

    Motion relative to the Uniform Background Radiation can be easily detected as well, by measuring the frequency shift.

    The main problem with SR and GR is that they use different observational protocols, leading to different metrics.

    BTW: Dr. Gerald Kelly checked Hafele and Keating’s results in the Archives. He found that their totality of results showed decisively that there was no “time dilation.” That falsifies GR.

    No doubt many people oppose SR & GR for the “wrong” reasons. Physical reality refutes SR & GR, and corroborates Classical Mechanics and a ballistic theory of light..

    As Heisenberg stated: “Classical Mechanics is everywhere exactly ‘right’, wherever its concepts can be applied.”

    Regards,

    Tony

    Regards,

    Tony

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